Reference Entry

Amarna style

Ian M. E. Shaw

in Oxford Art Online


Published online January 2003 | e-ISBN: 9781884446054 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gao/9781884446054.article.T002248

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Painting
  • Sculpture and Carving
  • African Art (Sub-Saharan)
  • Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern Art
  • Prehistoric Art
  • Art of the Middle East and North Africa

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Ancient Egyptian art style that takes its name from Amarna, (Tell) el-, the site of the capital city during the reigns of Akhenaten (reg c. 1353–c. 1336 bc) and Smenkhkare (reg c. 1335–c. 1332 bc). Amarna-style painting and sculpture were characterized by a move away from the traditional idealism of Egyptian art towards a greater realism and artistic freedom. This new sense of vigour and naturalism is most apparent in surviving fragments of paintings from the walls and floors of palaces (Cairo, Egyp. Mus., and Oxford, Ashmolean; see Egypt, ancient §X 2.). The statuary and reliefs, mainly from el-Amarna, Thebes and Hermopolis Magna, represent the royal family and their subjects in a style that was initially grotesque and often crude, as the artists struggled to come to terms with the new approach (see Egypt, ancient §IX 3., (viii)). However, they eventually reached a high degree of sophistication and beauty, exemplified by the painted limestone bust of Queen ...

Reference Entry.  212 words. 

Subjects: Painting ; Sculpture and Carving ; African Art (Sub-Saharan) ; Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern Art ; Prehistoric Art ; Art of the Middle East and North Africa

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or purchase to access all content.