Journal Article

An ACE Unit With a Delirium Room May Improve Function and Equalize Length of Stay Among Older Delirious Medical Inpatients

Joseph H. Flaherty, D. Kimberly Steele, John T. Chibnall, Vijaya N. Vasudevan, Nazem Bassil and Srivalli Vegi

in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A

Volume 65A, issue 12, pages 1387-1392
Published in print December 2010 | ISSN: 1079-5006
Published online August 2010 | e-ISSN: 1758-535X | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glq136
An ACE Unit With a Delirium Room May Improve Function and Equalize Length of Stay Among Older Delirious Medical Inpatients

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Geriatric Medicine
  • Public Health
  • Biological Sciences
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Neuroscience

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background.

Patients with delirium, compared with those without, are at increased risk for loss of function, longer hospital stays, and increased mortality. We studied the effect that an Acute Care of the Elderly Unit, which includes a delirium room, has on patients with delirium.

Methods.

Retrospective observational study. Charts of 148 patients (≥65 years) admitted to an Acute Care of the Elderly Unit with a delirium room during a 4-month period were reviewed. Delirium on admission (prevalence) was based on physician-performed Confusion Assessment Method; delirium during hospital stay (incidence) was based on nurse-performed Confusion Assessment Method. Patients with delirium were compared with those without delirium regarding change in function between admission and discharge (activities of daily living), hospital length of stay, and mortality.

Results.

The prevalence of delirium was 16.2% (24/148), and the incidence was 16.1% (20/124). There were no significant differences between delirious and non–delirious patients in demographics or comorbidity scores. A significant interaction effect (p < .001) indicated improved activities of daily living (mean ± SD; scale 0–12) between admission and discharge among delirious patients (4.1 ± 4.6 and 6.1 ± 3.9) compared with non–delirious patients (7.4 ± 4.7 and 6.9 ± 4.5). There were no differences between delirious and non–delirious patients with reference to mean length of stay (6.4 ± 3.1 vs 5.9 ± 3.6 days, respectively; p = .461) and mortality (2 [4.5%] versus 2 [1.9%], respectively; p = .582).

Conclusions.

Although this study sample was small, the results suggest that an Acute Care of the Elderly Unit with a delirium room may improve function among delirious patients and may equalize other outcomes compared with non–delirious patients.

Keywords: Delirium; ACE Unit; Delirium Room

Journal Article.  3908 words. 

Subjects: Geriatric Medicine ; Public Health ; Biological Sciences ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Neuroscience

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.