Journal Article

Detection of Gut Dysbiosis due to Reduced Clostridium Subcluster XIVa Using the Fecal or Serum Bile Acid Profile

Masashi Murakami, Junichi Iwamoto, Akira Honda, Takeshi Tsuji, Makoto Tamamushi, Hajime Ueda, Tadakuni Monma, Naoki Konishi, Shoichiro Yara, Takeshi Hirayama, Teruo Miyazaki, Yoshifumi Saito, Tadashi Ikegami and Yasushi Matsuzaki

in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Volume 24, issue 5, pages 1035-1044
Published in print April 2018 | ISSN: 1078-0998
Published online April 2018 | e-ISSN: 1536-4844 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izy022
Detection of Gut Dysbiosis due to Reduced Clostridium Subcluster XIVa Using the Fecal or Serum Bile Acid Profile

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  • Medicine and Health
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  • Gastro-intestinal and Colorectal Surgery

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Abstract

Background

Dysbiosis, especially a reduced Clostridium subcluster XIVa (XIVa), has been reported in several gastrointestinal diseases. Since XIVa is thought to be the main bacterial cluster that metabolizes bile acids (BAs) in the human intestine, we hypothesized that the BA profile in feces, and possibly in serum, could be a convenient biomarker for intestinal XIVa activity.

Methods

First, blood and feces were collected from 26 healthy controls and 20 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, and the relationships among fecal microbiomes and fecal and serum BA compositions were studied. Second, serum BA compositions of 30 healthy controls and the remission and exacerbation states of 14 Crohn’s disease (CD) and 12 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were compared. Fecal microbiomes were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and BA compositions were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS.

Results

The highest positive correlation was observed between the fecal XIVa proportion and fecal unconjugated deoxycholic acid (DCA)/(DCA+unconjugated cholic acid [CA]) (r = 0.77, P < 0.0001) or serum DCA/(DCA+CA) (r = 0.52, P < 0.001). Diurnal variation in serum XIVa candidate markers also showed that DCA/(DCA+CA) was most stable and not affected by the contraction of the gallbladder. Serum DCA/(DCA+CA) was not significantly different between remission and exacerbation states in either CD or UC patients, but was significantly reduced in those in the remission state of CD and the remission and exacerbation states of UC compared with healthy controls (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Decreased XIVa exhibits a strong correlation with reduced intestinal BA metabolism. Fecal and serum DCA/(DCA+CA) could be useful surrogate markers for the intestinal proportion of XIVa.

Keywords: bile acids; Clostridium subcluster XIVa; gut dysbiosis; HPLC-MS/MS

Journal Article.  5832 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medicine and Health ; Clinical Medicine ; Gastroenterology ; Patient Education and Information ; Gastro-intestinal and Colorectal Surgery

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