Journal Article

Local Ownership of Global Governance

Vasuki Nesiah

in Journal of International Criminal Justice

Volume 14, issue 4, pages 985-1009
Published in print September 2016 | ISSN: 1478-1387
Published online October 2016 | e-ISSN: 1478-1395 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jicj/mqw046
Local Ownership of Global Governance

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Criminal Law
  • International Law
  • International Criminal Law
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Transnational Crime

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Arguments for local ownership are often associated with a language and modality for resistance to a global order, and invocations of the local are often seen as a productive route for Third World Approaches to International Law. However, the core argument of this article is that the local is also constituted globally. Accordingly, the terrain of resistance and third world approaches has become much more complicated. The International Criminal Court (ICC) is an institution of global governance that is also a locus for policies and programmes regarding the local. The ICC has grounded its legitimacy, on the one hand, on claims that it is shaped by universal norms (including those reflected in human rights and humanitarian law); on the other, on claims that there is local ownership of the priorities and agendas that the ICC pursues. Through an analysis of two cases in the ICC docket from Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo this article describes how technologies of governmentality and government have knit local ownership to global governance. Thus, local ownership moves from dissent against the dominant global order to being its conduit — sanitized, depoliticized and universally recommended as, (ostensibly), the rule of no one for everyone. This article is not arguing for or against local ownership; it is arguing instead that in the context of the ICC cases discussed, many of the strategies that were advanced in contesting global governance in the name of local ownership have been assimilated into the very governance armature they sought to challenge.

Journal Article.  12777 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law ; International Law ; International Criminal Law ; International Humanitarian Law ; Transnational Crime

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.