Journal Article

Ability of Unfed Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae) to Survive a Second Winter as Adults in Manitoba, Canada, Near the Northern Limit of Their Range

Matthew E. M. Yunik, Terry D. Galloway and L. Robbin Lindsay

in Journal of Medical Entomology

Published on behalf of Entomological Society of America

Volume 52, issue 2, pages 138-142
Published in print March 2015 | ISSN: 0022-2585
Published online February 2015 | e-ISSN: 1938-2928 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jme/tju061
Ability of Unfed Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae) to Survive a Second Winter as Adults in Manitoba, Canada, Near the Northern Limit of Their Range

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One thousand seven hundred unfed field-collected adult Dermacentor variabilis (Say) were overwintered in 34 outdoor enclosures near the northern limit of their distribution in Manitoba, Canada. At the northern limits of the range of D. variabilis, it had always been assumed that unfed adult ticks questing in spring succumbed before the next winter and were not part of the population observed in the following year. Survival of the collected ticks was assessed on two occasions. In midwinter, an average 39.4% (SE ± 2.50) of the ticks were still alive, while an average 19.9% (SE ± 1.14) survived to April. Female ticks had significantly higher survivorship than males. The ability to survive an additional winter allows ticks to act in a greater capacity as reservoirs for tick-associated pathogens in this region.

Keywords: winter survival; northern distribution limit; vector potential; snow cover

Journal Article.  3738 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Disease Ecology and Epidemiology ; Entomology

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