Journal Article

Web-based discovery and integration of archaeological historic properties inventory data: The Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA)

Joshua J. Wells, Eric C. Kansa, Sarah W. Kansa, Stephen J. Yerka, David G. Anderson, Thaddeus G. Bissett, Kelsey Noack Myers and R. Carl DeMuth

in Literary and Linguistic Computing

Published on behalf of EADH: The European Association for Digital Humanities

Volume 29, issue 3, pages 349-360
Published in print September 2014 | ISSN: 0268-1145
Published online June 2014 | e-ISSN: 1477-4615 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqu028
Web-based discovery and integration of archaeological historic properties inventory data: The Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA)

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Integrating data from different sources represents a tremendous research opportunity across the humanities, social, and natural sciences. However, repurposing data for uses not imagined or anticipated by their creators involves conceptual, methodological, and theoretical challenges. These are acute in archaeology, a discipline that straddles the humanities and sciences. Heritage protection laws shape archaeological practice and generate large bodies of data, largely untapped for research or other purposes. The Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA) project adapts heritage management data sets for broader open and public uses. DINAA’s initial goal is to integrate government-curated public data from off-line and online digital repositories, from up to twenty US states, and which qualitatively and quantitatively describe over 500,000 archaeological sites in eastern North America. DINAA hopes to promote extension and reuse by government personnel, as well as by domestic and international researchers interested in the cultures, histories, artifacts, and behaviors described within these public data sets. DINAA innovatively applies methodologies and workflows typical of many ‘open science’ and digital humanities programs to these data sets. The distributed nature of data production, coupled with protections for sensitive data, add layers of complexity. Ethically negotiating these issues can wider the collaboration between stakeholder communities, and offer an unprecedented new view on human use of the North American landscape across vast regions and time scales.

Journal Article.  2576 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Computational Linguistics ; Language Teaching and Learning ; Bibliography ; Digital Lifestyle ; Information and Communication Technologies

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