Chapter

Death and Organ Donation

Robert C. Macauley

in Ethics in Palliative Care

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print March 2018 | ISBN: 9780199313945
Published online April 2018 | e-ISBN: 9780190652357 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/med/9780199313945.003.0016
Death and Organ Donation

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The concept of death by neurological criteria (i.e., brain death) was formulated in 1968 to describe a state of complete and irreversible loss of brain function. While there remain philosophical debates about the validity of the concept, it is enshrined in state law—with a few notable limitations—and impacts both the role of continued somatic support as well as making possible the donation of vital organs. In light of the shortage of organs available for transplantation, greater attention has recently been paid to death by circulatory criteria procurement protocols. One significant source of disagreement is the duration of pulselessness required to declare death and whether circulation needs to be irreversibly ceased or only permanently so.

Chapter.  11925 words. 

Subjects: Palliative Medicine ; Patient Care and End-of-Life Decision Making ; Medical Ethics

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