Journal Article

Dermatophytes and dermatophytosis in the eastern and southern parts of Africa

E I Nweze and I E Eke

in Medical Mycology

Published on behalf of International Society for Human and Animal Mycology

Volume 56, issue 1, pages 13-28
Published in print January 2018 | ISSN: 1369-3786
Published online April 2017 | e-ISSN: 1460-2709 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mmy/myx025
Dermatophytes and dermatophytosis in the eastern and southern parts of Africa

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medical Toxicology
  • Environmental Science
  • Mycology and Fungi
  • Veterinary Medicine

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Abstract

Dermatophytosis is currently a disease of global importance and a public health burden. It is caused by dermatophytes, which attack and grow on dead animal keratin. Dermatophytes belong to three genera, namely, Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. The predominant clinical forms and causative agents vary from one region of the world to another. Poor socioeconomic status, high population densities, and poor sanitary conditions are some of the factors responsible for the high prevalence of dermatophytosis in many developing countries, which include countries in southern and eastern Africa, the focus of this review. To the best of our knowledge, there is currently no review article on published findings on dermatophytosis in the eastern and southern parts of Africa. This information will be of interest to the medical and research community since the world has become a global village. This review covers published research findings in eastern and southern regions of Africa until this date. The countries covered in the current review include Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, South Africa, Mozambique, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Botswana. T. violaceum is the most common human etiological agent in all the countries under review with prevalence ranging from 56.7% to 95%, except for Madagascar (M. langeronii, reclassified as M. audouinii), Uganda (M. gypseum) and Malawi (M. audouinii). Tinea capitis was the most clinical type, followed by tinea corporis. Etiological agents of animal dermatophytoses were variable in the countries where they were reported. Major risk factors for dermatophytoses are age, climatic, and socioeconomic factors.

Keywords: Southern Africa; Eastern Africa; Dermatophytes; Dermatophytoses; Skin infection; Keratin

Journal Article.  12383 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Medical Toxicology ; Environmental Science ; Mycology and Fungi ; Veterinary Medicine

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.