Journal Article

Serial correlations in Continuous Flash Suppression

Pieter Moors, Timo Stein, Johan Wagemans and Raymond van Ee

in Neuroscience of Consciousness

Published on behalf of Neuroscience

Volume 2015, issue 1
Published online December 2015 | e-ISSN: 2057-2107 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nc/niv010

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Neuroscience
  • Cognition and Behavioural Neuroscience
  • Neuroscientific Techniques
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Consciousness

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Research on visual rivalry has demonstrated that consecutive dominance durations are serially dependent, implying that the underlying competition mechanism is not driven by some random process but includes a memory component. Here we asked whether serial dependence is also observed in continuous flash suppression (CFS). We addressed this question by analyzing a large dataset of time series of suppression durations obtained in a series of so-called “breaking CFS” experiments in which the duration of the period is measured until a suppressed target breaks through the CFS mask. Across experimental manipulations, stimuli, and observers, we found that (i) the distribution of breakthrough rates was fit less well by a gamma distribution than in conventional visual rivalry paradigms, (ii) the suppression duration on a previous trial influenced the suppression duration on a later trial up to as long as a lag of eight trials, and (iii) the mechanism underlying these serial correlations was predominantly monocular. We conclude that the underlying competition mechanism of CFS also includes a memory component that is primarily, but not necessarily exclusively, monocular in nature. We suggest that the temporal dependency structure of suppression durations in CFS is akin to those observed in binocular rivalry, which might imply that both phenomena tap into similar rather than distinct mechanisms.

Keywords: psychophysics; perception; awareness

Journal Article.  6600 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience ; Cognition and Behavioural Neuroscience ; Neuroscientific Techniques ; Cognitive Neuroscience ; Consciousness

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.