Article

Aristotle's Political Thought

Eugene Garver

in Political Science

ISBN: 9780199756223
Published online January 2016 | | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756223-0148
Aristotle's Political Thought

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Politics
  • Comparative Politics
  • Political Institutions
  • Political Methodology
  • Political Theory

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Aristotle divides practical science into ethics and politics. The Nicomachean Ethics ends with a transition to the Politics, setting out a program of debatable relation to what has come down to us as the Politics. The Politics is named after the polis (plural: poleis), the city-states of Greece. Two other key terms in the Politics are, in Greek, related to polis: the citizen is a politês and what is translated as constitution, regime, or citizenship is the politeia, a word also used by Aristotle to designate one particular constitution, usually translated as polity. The word translated as government is politeuma. The interconnections among these terms form one of the themes of the Politics. The polis is an ensemble of citizens (III.1.1274b41), and one polis differs from another by its politeia. For details of the history of the transmission of the text, the Greek text itself, and other philological issues, see Lockwood’s article Aristotle’s Politics in the Classics section of Oxford Bibliographies, to which this bibliography is heavily indebted. For purposes of brevity, the bibliography is confined, with few exceptions, to works in English.

Article.  11609 words. 

Subjects: Politics ; Comparative Politics ; Political Institutions ; Political Methodology ; Political Theory

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.