Article

Restorative Practices

Shireen Pavri

in Education

ISBN: 9780199756810
Published online January 2016 | | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780199756810-0135
Restorative Practices

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  • Education
  • Organization and Management of Education
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Organizations with a social justice mission are increasingly looking to adopt practices that promote healthy and safe communities and foster a sense of belonging and community support among participants. Rooted in the principles of restorative justice, restorative practices help traditionally hierarchical social organizations shift away from existing power imbalances that emphasize social control. Adopting restorative practices helps institutions create equitable relationships among members and emphasize individual and social accountability and engagement. Retribution and punishment give way to restoration and engagement in resolving conflict. Since the 1990s, there has been an increasing application of restorative practices in education, counseling, and other professional disciplines. Restorative practices are gaining popularity in educational settings such as K–12 schools and universities where they are used to establish proactive school discipline, a positive school climate, and connections within the school community. In direct contrast to the punitive, zero tolerance approaches that have been prevalent in schools, restorative practices target reparation, forgiveness, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior and coping strategies. A growing body of evidence indicates that restorative practices help school systems tackle issues such as student disengagement, bullying, truancy, youth crime, and school violence. Restorative practices are viable approaches, proven to reform racially biased school discipline policies and practices and to reduce school suspension and expulsion rates. Commonly used restorative strategies include community restorative circles, mediation, group conferences, perspective taking, community reparation boards, and healing circles.

Article.  7837 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Organization and Management of Education ; Philosophy and Theory of Education ; Schools Studies ; Teaching Skills and Techniques

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