Chapter

Causes and combinations in the long nineteenth century

Nicholas Owen

in Other People's Struggles

Published in print September 2019 | ISBN: 9780190945862
Published online July 2019 | e-ISBN: 9780190945893 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190945862.003.0004
Causes and combinations in the long nineteenth century

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  • Comparative and Historical Sociology
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Chapter 4 develops, through a historical illustration, the arguments concerning motivation presented in chapter 3. It makes a distinction between causes—movements made up of adherents motivated (disjointly) by others’ gains—and combinations—movements made up of constituents motivated (conjointly) by their own gains. This distinction is applied to three British historical cases from the long nineteenth century, to explain why—and with what consequences—the place of adherents differed between the metropolitan antislavery movement of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, the Chartists of the mid-nineteenth century, and movements of and for the poor (“neighboring” and “charity”) in the Victorian slums in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Keywords: conscience constituent; adherent; cause; combination; antislavery; Chartism; neighboring; charity; nineteenth-century Britain

Chapter.  7764 words. 

Subjects: Comparative and Historical Sociology ; Social Movements and Social Change ; Political Sociology

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