Article

Anomia and Anomic Aphasia: Implications for Lexical Processing

Stacy M. Harnish

in The Oxford Handbook of Aphasia and Language Disorders

Published in print January 2018 | ISBN: 9780199772391
Published online January 2015 | e-ISBN: 9780199984244 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199772391.013.7

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Anomia and Anomic Aphasia: Implications for Lexical Processing

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Anomia is a term that describes the inability to retrieve a desired word, and is the most common deficit present across different aphasia syndromes. Anomic aphasia is a specific aphasia syndrome characterized by a primary deficit of word retrieval with relatively spared performance in other language domains, such as auditory comprehension and sentence production. Damage to a number of cognitive and motor systems can produce errors in word retrieval tasks, only subsets of which are language deficits. In the cognitive and neuropsychological underpinnings section, we discuss the major processing steps that occur in lexical retrieval and outline how deficits at each of the stages may produce anomia. The neuroanatomical correlates section will include a review of lesion and neuroimaging studies of language processing to examine anomia and anomia recovery in the acute and chronic stages. The assessment section will highlight how discrepancies in performance between tasks contrasting output modes and input modalities may provide insight into the locus of impairment in anomia. Finally, the treatment section will outline some of the rehabilitation techniques for forms of anomia, and take a closer look at the evidence base for different aspects of treatment.

Keywords: Anomia; Anomic aphasia; Word retrieval; Lexical processing

Article.  17232 words. 

Subjects: Cognitive Neuroscience

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