Journal Article

ACCELERATED GROWTH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED SYSTOLIC AND DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE

Karen Eny, Jonathon Maguire, David Dai, Gerald Lebovic, Khosrow Adeli, Jill Hamilton, Anthony Hanley, Muhammad Mamdani, Brian McCrindle, Mark Tremblay, Patricia Parkin and Catherine Birken

in Paediatrics & Child Health

Published on behalf of Canadian Paediatric Society

Volume 23, issue suppl_1 Published in print May 2018 | ISSN: 1205-7088
Published online May 2018 | e-ISSN: 1918-1485 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pch/pxy054.031
ACCELERATED GROWTH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED SYSTOLIC AND DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Neonatology
  • Primary Care
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
  • Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal obesity, low birthweight, and accelerated growth have been shown to be associated with elevated blood pressure in children. However, it is unknown which growth periods are associated with blood pressure, and whether birthweight or maternal obesity modify the relationship between growth and blood pressure in early childhood.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the relationship between age- and sex-standardized body mass index (zBMI) growth trajectories with longitudinal measures of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure in early childhood.

DESIGN/METHODS

We collected repeated measures of zBMI and blood pressure in 2502 children participating in the TARGet Kids! cohort. In stage 1 we used linear spline multilevel models to estimate each child’s zBMI at birth and zBMI growth trajectories in early infancy (0–3 m), late infancy (3–18 m) and toddler years (18–36 m). In stage 2 we used generalized estimating equations to examine the relationship between zBMI at birth and zBMI growth with repeated measures of SBP and DBP from 3 to 6 years of age. We tested for effect modification by birthweight and maternal obesity status by inclusion of interaction terms in each growth period.

RESULTS

After adjusting for confounders and prior growth, a 1 standard deviation unit increase in zBMI growth per month in early infancy (β=0.59; 95% CI 0.32,0.87) and late infancy (β=0.73; 95% CI 0.44,1.01), were associated with higher SBP. Growth in the toddler years was not significantly associated with SBP (p=0.08). Similar but smaller associations were observed for zBMI growth and DBP in early (β=0.29; 95% CI 0.04, 0.53) and late infancy (β=0.42; 95% CI 0.18, 0.66). Birthweight status modified (p=0.004) the relationship between zBMI growth and SBP during late infancy, with the strongest positive association observed in the low birthweight group. During toddler years, birthweight status modified the relationship between zBMI growth with SBP (p=0.03) and DBP (p=0.04), with the strongest positive association observed in the low birthweight group, followed by the high birthweight group. Maternal obesity status modified (p= 0.03) the relationship between zBMI growth with DBP in late infancy, with a stronger association observed among children of mothers with obesity.

CONCLUSION

Accelerated growth in early and late infancy are associated with increased blood pressure in early childhood. Growth during late infancy and toddler years may impact blood pressure differently in children born with high and low birthweights and high maternal BMI, suggesting prospective windows and risk groups to target interventions.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Neonatology ; Primary Care ; Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ; Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology ; Developmental Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.