Journal Article

USING CHEST COMPRESSIONS WITH ASYNCHRONOUS VENTILATION AT VARIOUS CHEST COMPRESSION RATES (90, 100, 120/MIN) – A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED ANIMAL TRIAL

Sparsh Patel, Po-Yin Cheung, Tze-Fun Lee, Matteo Pasquin, Megan O’Reilly and Georg Schmolzer

in Paediatrics & Child Health

Published on behalf of Canadian Paediatric Society

Volume 23, issue suppl_1 Published in print May 2018 | ISSN: 1205-7088
Published online May 2018 | e-ISSN: 1918-1485 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pch/pxy054.071
USING CHEST COMPRESSIONS WITH ASYNCHRONOUS VENTILATION AT VARIOUS CHEST COMPRESSION RATES (90, 100, 120/MIN) – A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED ANIMAL TRIAL

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  • Neonatology
  • Primary Care
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
  • Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The current Pediatric Advanced Life Support guidelines recommends that newborns who require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in settings (e.g., prehospital, Emergency department, or paediatric intensive care unit, etc.) should receive continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilations (CCaV) if an advanced airway is in place. However, this has never been examined in a newborn model of neonatal asphyxia.

OBJECTIVES

To determine if CCaV at rates of 90/min or 120/min compared to current standard of 100/min will reduce the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in a porcine model of neonatal resuscitation.

DESIGN/METHODS

Term newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 40-min normocapnic hypoxia followed by asphyxia, which was achieved by clamping the endotracheal tube until asystole. Piglets were randomized into 3 CCaV groups: chest compression (CC) at a rate of 90/min (CCaV 90,n=7), of 100/min (CCaV 100,n=7), of 120/min (CCaV 120,n=7), or sham-operated group. A two-step randomization process with sequentially numbered, sealed brown envelope was used to reduce selection bias. After surgical instrumentation and stabilization an envelope containing the allocation “sham” or “intervention” was opened (step one). The sham-operated group had the same surgical protocol, stabilization, and equivalent experimental periods without hypoxia and asphyxia. Only piglets randomized to “intervention” underwent hypoxia and asphyxia. Once the criteria for CPR were met, a second envelope containing the group allocations was opened (step two). Cardiac function, carotid blood flow, cerebral oxygenation, and respiratory parameters were continuously recorded throughout the experiment.

RESULTS

The mean (±SD) duration of asphyxia was similar between the groups with 260 (±133)sec, 336 (±217)sec, and 231 (±174)sec for CCav 90, CCaV 100, and CCaV 120, respectively (p=1.000; oneway ANOVA with Bonferroni post-test). The mean (SD) time to ROSC was also similar between groups 342 (±345)sec, 312 (±316)sec, and 309 (±287)sec for CCav 90, CCaV 100, and CCaV 120, respectively (p=1.000; oneway ANOVA with Bonferroni post-test). Overall, 5/7 in the CCaV 90, 5/7 in CCaV 100, and 5/7 in the CCaV 120 survived.

CONCLUSION

There was no significant difference in time to ROSC for either chest compression technique during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of neonatal asphyxia.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Neonatology ; Primary Care ; Child and Adolescent Psychiatry ; Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology ; Developmental Psychology

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