Journal Article

The Heaton Review, 1927–1934: culture, class and a sense of place in inter-war Yorkshire1

Dave Russell

in Twentieth Century British History

Volume 17, issue 3, pages 323-349
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 0955-2359
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1477-4674 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tcbh/hwl018
The Heaton Review, 1927–1934: culture, class and a sense of place in inter-war Yorkshire1

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The Heaton Review (1927–1934), initially a parish from the Bradford suburb of Heaton, evolved to become an ambitious magazine of literature and the arts. A significant product of middle-class voluntarism in its own right – contributors included Neville Cardus, John Galsworthy, Sir William Rothenstein and even Rabindranath Tagore – it also provides an interesting perspective on the role of local and regional identities within middle-class culture. The magazine celebrated certain aspects of local and regional life, defending the rural landscapes and historic buildings of the locality but without marginalising the urban and the industrial in the manner so frequent within contemporary expressions of ‘Englishness’. At the same time, it sought to challenge the growing cultural hegemony of London and the south-east. While an increasingly ‘national’ middle-class culture has been seen as a feature of the inter-war period, Heaton Review suggests a structure of feeling that might best be described as ‘national-provincial’, typified by an awareness of wider currents but proud of local achievement and anxious to see ‘national’ life as something experienced close to home.

Journal Article.  11187 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945) ; Contemporary History (Post 1945) ; British History

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