Journal Article

Naming Aspergillus species: progress towards one name for each species

David L. Hawksworth

in Medical Mycology

Published on behalf of International Society for Human and Animal Mycology

Volume 49, issue Supplement_1, pages S70-S76
Published in print April 2011 | ISSN: 1369-3786
Published online April 2011 | e-ISSN: 1460-2709 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13693786.2010.504753
Naming Aspergillus species: progress towards one name for each species

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  • Mycology and Fungi
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The nomenclature of fungi is governed by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. That Code is revised at each International Botanical Congress. This Code has permitted most fungi expressing both sexual and asexual states (i.e., pleomorphic fungi) to be accorded separate name(s) for the asexual states. Prior to 1981, the rules on naming pleomorphic fungi had become complicated and were not being applied consistently by mycologists. The changes made in 1981 simplified procedures but resulted in numerous name changes in Aspergillus. Molecular data in particular can now resolve the phylogenetic position of a fungus regardless of whether it expresses sexual or asexual structures. A growing consensus now wishes to either remove entirely or drastically amend the provision to permit separate names to be used for different states of the same species. Some initial changes towards that eventual goal were made at the 2005 International Botanical Congress, and a Special Committee then appointed is debating the most appropriate action to take. In the interim, in order to minimize confusion, mycologists working with Aspergillus and other affected genera are urged to refrain from both introducing new scientific names for further states of already known species, and also from using any such names proposed.

Keywords: Anamorph; fungi; holomorph; nomenclature; teleomorph

Journal Article.  4468 words. 

Subjects: Mycology and Fungi ; Infectious Diseases ; Medical Toxicology ; Veterinary Medicine ; Environmental Science

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