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acme zone

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Ecology and Conservation.

Informally, a body of strata that contains the maximum abundance of a particular fossil taxon occurring within the stratigraphic range of that taxon, and after which the zone is named.

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biostratigraphy

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

The branch of stratigraphy that involves the use of fossil plants and animals in the dating and correlation of the stratigraphic sequences of rock in which they are discovered. A zone is...

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biozone

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences — Earth Sciences and Geography.

1 The total, global, time-stratigraphic range of a given taxon, i.e. all the rocks laid down in the time interval during which that taxon existed.

2 A...

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b-zone

Overview page. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation — Earth Sciences and Geography.

A biostratigraphic zone that is distinguished by benthonic (see benthos) fossils (e.g. brachiopods and trilobites). The term was proposed in 1965 by T. G. Miller. Compare p-zone.

See overview in Oxford Index

geochronometry

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Ecology and Conservation.

The determination of the length of time intervals. Geochronometric resolutions for zonations based on different organisms may be calculated by dividing the time-span of a series by the...

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index fossil

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences — Earth Sciences and Geography.

A fossil whose presence is characteristic of a particular unit of rock (the zone) in which it occurs and after which that zone is named.

See overview in Oxford Index

p-zone

Overview page. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation — Earth Sciences and Geography.

A biostratigraphic zone distinguished by pelagic fossils, e.g. ammonites (Ammonoidea) and graptolites (Graptolithina). The term was proposed in 1965 by T. G. Miller. Compare b-zone.

See overview in Oxford Index