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Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment x Labour and Demographic Economics x clear all

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The ins and outs of German unemployment: a transatlantic perspective

Matthias S. Hertweck and Oliver Sigrist.

in Oxford Economic Papers

October 2015; p ublished online April 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 7563 words.

This article decomposes fluctuations in the German unemployment rate into changes in inflows (job separation) and outflows (job finding). For this purpose, we construct and examine monthly...

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Intertemporal Labour Supply with Search Frictions

Claudio Michelacci and Josep Pijoan-Mas.

in The Review of Economic Studies

July 2012; p ublished online November 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Demand and Supply of Labour; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Wages, Compensation, and Labour Costs. 16977 words.

Starting in the 1970's, wage inequality and the number of hours worked by employed U.S. prime-age male workers have both increased. We argue that these two facts are related. We use a...

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Learning Your Comparative Advantages

Theodore Papageorgiou.

in The Review of Economic Studies

July 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Demand and Supply of Labour; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 16626 words.

While employed, workers learn their comparative advantage and eventually choose occupations that best match their abilities. This learning process is consistent with a number of key facts...

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The Morale Effects of Pay Inequality

Emily Breza, Supreet Kaur and Yogita Shamdasani.

in The Quarterly Journal of Economics

May 2018; p ublished online October 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Wages, Compensation, and Labour Costs; Economic Development; Microeconomics; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment. 20293 words.

Abstract

Relative-pay concerns have potentially broad labor market implications. In a month-long experiment with Indian manufacturing workers, we randomize...

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Neo-liberalism and New Labour policy: economic performance, historical comparisons and future prospects

Frank Wilkinson.

in Cambridge Journal of Economics

November 2007; p ublished online October 2007 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; General Aggregative Models; Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles; Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 11664 words.

The paper analyses19760/70s inflation, the replacement of Keynesian with neo-liberal economic policy, and the post-1979 decline in inflation. It is shown that the fall in inflation is...

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On-the-Job Search and Precautionary Savings

Jeremy Lise.

in The Review of Economic Studies

July 2013; p ublished online December 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Microeconomics; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 13303 words.

In this article, I develop and estimate a model of on-the-job search in which risk averse workers choose search effort and can borrow or save using a single risk free asset. I derive the...

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Persistence of Employment Fluctuations: A Model of Recurring Job Loss

Michael J. Pries.

in The Review of Economic Studies

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Particular Labour Markets; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 12955 words.

Standard models of employment fluctuations cannot reconcile the unemployment rate's remarkable persistence with the high job-finding rates found in worker flows data. A matching model...

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Product market imperfections and employment dynamics

Mikael Carlsson, Stefan Eriksson and Nils Gottfries.

in Oxford Economic Papers

April 2013; p ublished online September 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Demand and Supply of Labour; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Mobility, Unemployment, and Vacancies. 8149 words.

How important is imperfect competition in the product market for employment dynamics? To investigate this, we formulate a model of employment adjustment with search frictions, vacancy...

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Profit sharing and its effect on income distribution and output: a Kaleckian approach

Hiroaki Sasaki.

in Cambridge Journal of Economics

March 2016; p ublished online February 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: General Aggregative Models; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Labour-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining. 8350 words.

This study investigates how profit sharing influences the economy by using a Kaleckian model. Unlike existing research, I endogenise the profit share. The analysis shows that profit sharing...

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The Role of Effort for Self-Insurance and Its Consequences for the Wealth Distribution

Andres Zambrano.

in The World Bank Economic Review

June 2015; p ublished online April 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Intertemporal Choice and Growth; Macroeconomics: Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment; Demand and Supply of Labour. 2593 words.

I explore the effect of effort as a mechanism to alleviate the idiosyncratic risk faced by individuals in the presence of incomplete markets. I construct a DSGE model where costly effort...

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