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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

Michael Kent

Published in print January 2006 | ISBN: 9780198568506
Published online January 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780191727788 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acref/9780198568506.001.0001
The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

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acceleration, law of

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 122 words.

Newton's second law of motion, commonly known as the law of a acceleration, which states that when a body is acted on by a ...

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acceleration of free fall

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 91 words.

Constant acceleration of a body falling freely under gravity, in a vacuum, or when air resistance is negligible. It varies slightly in different geographical locations as a result of...

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acceleration sprint

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 75 words.

A special form of sprint training in which running speed is gradually increased from jogging to striding and, finally, to sprinting at maximum pace. Each component is usually about 50 m...

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acceleration–time curve

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 29 words.

A graphical representation of acceleration plotted against time. It is used in the analysis of an athlete's performance at different phases of a run, cycle, swim, etc....

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accelerometer

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 10 words.

A device that measures the acceleration of a system.

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acceptance

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 47 words.

1 A phase of hypnosis during which the subject accepts the idea, judgement, or belief suggested.

2 A coping strategy used by athletes to deal with social...

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access

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 46 words.

1 The extent to which facilities, including participation in a sport, are available to people whatever their social category (e.g. ability, ethnicity, colour, gender, or sexual...

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accessory bone

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 39 words.

A bone, such as the os trigonum, not present in all people, that develops from a separate centre of ossification from the parent bone to which it may or may not be joined....

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accidental injury

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 5 words.

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accident-prone

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 120 words.

Applied to a person who suffers more than the usual number of accidents. An accident is sometimes defined as ‘an injury with no apparent cause’. Each year, thousands of exercisers are...

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acclimation

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 30 words.

A reversible adaptation to changes in a single environmental factor (e.g. temperature). Acclimation is applied most commonly to physiological experiments conducted in a laboratory under...

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acclimatization

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 21 words.

A reversible physiological adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. a change of altitude or climate. See also altitude acclimatization, heat acclimatization...

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accommodation

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 141 words.

1 Process by which the shape of the lens in the eye changes so that distant or near objects can be brought into focus. Accommodation, with ...

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accommodation principle

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 43 words.

A principle stating that training should progress from the general to the specific. Initial concern should be with improving overall body condition and strength. Skills and specific fitness...

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accommodation to competition

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 31 words.

Response of an individual to frequent exposure to competitive situations. If accommodation is positive, the individual will have optimal levels of arousal so that performance can be...

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acculturation

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 75 words.

1 A process occurring when different cultural groups are in contact. Acculturation leads to the acquisition of new cultural patterns by one or more of the groups, with the...

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accumulated feedback

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 45 words.

A form of feedback in which information is presented to a performer after he or she has made a series of responses. The information represents a summary of all the responses, enabling the...

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accuracy

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 55 words.

1 The ability to hit a target.

2 Ability of a performer, such as an ice-skater, to repeat movements successfully....

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ACE

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 4 words.

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acetabular fossa

Michael Kent.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine. 32 words.

A cup-shaped depression in the pelvic girdle which serves as the attachment point of the ligamentum teres from the femur onto the acetabulum. It is perforated by numerous small holes....

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