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Bereavement

Inge B. Corless.

in Social Aspects of Care

November 2015; p ublished online February 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 10957 words.

This chapter emphasizes grief and loss as universal experiences occurring across the life span. It illustrates, through case examples, that as illness advances patients and their families...

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Cultural Considerations in Palliative Care

Polly Mazanec and Joan Panke.

in Social Aspects of Care

November 2015; p ublished online February 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 8193 words.

Quality palliative care requires attention to patient and family cultural values, practices, and beliefs. Culture is shown to consist of connections, not separation. It encompasses multiple...

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Delirium

Debra E. Heidrich and Nancy K. English.

in Care of the Imminently Dying

November 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 7921 words.

Delirium is a common neuropsychiatric disorder that is frequently underdiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and poorly managed. Often, patients are labeled as “confused,” and no further evaluation is...

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Dyspnea, Death Rattle, and Cough

Deborah Dudgeon.

in Care of the Imminently Dying

November 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 5363 words.

Dyspnea is a common symptom in people with advanced disease and, like pain, is a subjective experience that may not be evident to an observer. The prevalence of dyspnea varies according to...

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Planning for the Actual Death

Patricia Berry and Julie Griffie.

in Social Aspects of Care

November 2015; p ublished online February 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 11125 words.

The nurse provides much of the care and support to patients and families throughout the disease trajectory and is the profession most likely to be present at the time of death. This chapter...

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Sedation for Refractory Symptoms

Patti Knight, Laura A. Espinosa and Bonnie Freeman.

in Care of the Imminently Dying

November 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 5597 words.

Suffering at the end of life involves physical, psychological, social, and spiritual distress. In most situations, multidisciplinary palliative interventions provide effective comfort, but...

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Sexuality

Marianne Matzo.

in Social Aspects of Care

November 2015; p ublished online February 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 8789 words.

As patients draw close to the end of life, their needs, hopes, and concerns remain intact as in any other stage of their life. This chapter highlights sexuality as an integral part of the...

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Supporting Families in Palliative Care

Rose Steele and Betty Davies.

in Social Aspects of Care

November 2015; p ublished online February 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 9538 words.

This chapter addresses family-centered care as central to the philosophy of palliative care. It describes illness as being incorporated into every aspect of family life. Family and illness...

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Urgent Syndromes at the End of Life

Barton T. Bobb.

in Care of the Imminently Dying

November 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 9566 words.

Syndromes that will cause unnecessary suffering for the patient and family at the end of life include superior vena cava obstruction, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, hemoptysis,...

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Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapies

Margaret L. Campbell and Linda M. Gorman.

in Care of the Imminently Dying

November 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Nursing. 5853 words.

Withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, discontinuation of dialysis, and deactivation of cardiac devices are procedures that occur with relative frequency. The benefits of these therapies are...

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