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Classical Literature x Classical Poetry x clear all

‘A Man Having Died’: Watching Achilles and Hector

Tobias Myers.

in Homer's Divine Audience

June 2019; p ublished online August 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 12060 words.

Chapter 5 focuses on the poem’s two final prominent scenes of divine viewing: when Achilles pursues Hector around Troy, and when he drags Hector’s corpse around Patroclus’ burial marker....

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Aesthetic, Sociological, and Exploitative Attitudes to Landscape in Greco-Roman Literature, Art, and Culture

Diana Spencer.

P ublished online January 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Art and Architecture; Classical Poetry; Classical Reception. 16324 words.

This article introduces and discusses ancient and contemporary approaches to landscape and proposes model readings for their evaluation. Model readings suggest strategies drawn from...

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The ancient unconscious?

Vered Lev Kenaan.

in The Ancient Unconscious

May 2019; p ublished online July 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 11414 words.

A split is identified in modern European self-consciousness between an embrace of its formative influences in the ancient world and a historicist guarding of modern boundaries. When...

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The Ancient Unconscious

Vered Lev Kenaan.

May 2019; p ublished online July 2019 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 240 pages.

Commonly understood as a modern conceptual invention rather than the discovery of a psychic reality, the notion of the unconscious is often criticized by traditional classicists as an...

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The Anti-sophistic Novel

Daniel L. Selden.

in The Oxford Handbook to the Second Sophistic

December 2017; p ublished online November 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Poetry. 11824 words.

This chapter discusses the fraught relationship between Second Sophistic discourse and koinē fiction of the second and third centuries ce. Taking its point of departure from a comparison...

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The Archaic Context of Vengeance

Alexander C. Loney.

in The Ethics of Revenge and the Meanings of the Odyssey

April 2019; p ublished online May 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Poetry. 17425 words.

This chapter analyzes the ideology of retributive punishment in the wider context of archaic Greece. It begins by identifying the language associated with vengeance—words etymologically...

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Art, Nature, Power

Steven D. Smith.

in Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 7003 words.

This final chapter demonstrates the importance of contextualizing epigrams into the sociohistorical circumstances of their era if we want to achieve a deeper comprehension of the...

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Between Formalism and Historicism

Stephen Hinds.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies

June 2010; p ublished online September 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Classical Poetry. 7754 words.

Certain canonical texts can become programmatically associated with certain issues in literary criticism. Movements of critical thinking between formalism and historicism, along with the...

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The Canonical Nine on the Comic Stage

Theodora A. Hadjimichael.

in The Emergence of the Lyric Canon

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 17604 words.

Chapter 2 looks at the comic genre as a source of information about the Athenian audience’s knowledge and recognition of the lyric poets and their compositions. Comedy makes use of...

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Childhood memories

Vered Lev Kenaan.

in The Ancient Unconscious

May 2019; p ublished online July 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 16818 words.

An analysis in which the Homeric digression intersects with Freud’s notion of regression leads into a comprehensive reading of the Homeric episode of the foot washing of the Odyssey, Book...

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“Chinese Poetry”

Paul Rouzer.

in The Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature

May 2017; p ublished online April 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Poetry. 8768 words.

The chapter seeks to give a historical overview of elite shi, popular shi, fu, and Chuci forms up until 1000 ce, emphasizing the role of traditional theoretical perspectives in shaping or...

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Conclusion

Theodora A. Hadjimichael.

in The Emergence of the Lyric Canon

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 4227 words.

The Conclusion states the important points that were raised in each chapter, brings together all the conclusions, and contextualizes the overall analysis. It also emphasizes that the lyric...

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Conclusion: The Iliad and the Odyssey

Tobias Myers.

in Homer's Divine Audience

June 2019; p ublished online August 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 1541 words.

The Conclusion contrasts the Odyssey’s treatment of performance dynamics, which has been well studied, with that of the Iliad, the focus of the book. In doing so, it also sums up key...

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Death of a Child

Richard Hunter.

in Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 8652 words.

Chapter 9 explores the interrelationship between literary and inscriptional epigram, principally through a study of GV 1159 = SGO 03/05/04, a poem from imperial Notion on a young boy who...

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Deviant Origins: Hesiod’s Theogony and the Orphica

Radcliffe G. Edmonds III.

in The Oxford Handbook of Hesiod

September 2018; p ublished online August 2018 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Poetry; Religion in the Ancient World. 8665 words.

Hesiod’s Theogony provides one of the most widely authoritative accounts of the origin of the cosmos, but his account has always been challenged by rivals claiming to be older, wiser, and...

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Dreadful Eros, before and after Meleager

Gutzwiller Kathryn.

in Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 6731 words.

Chapter 14 exemplifies how Greek epigrams, despite their small size, develop larger topics, especially when interacting with one another in an epigrammatic series. The chapter argues,...

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The Duel and the Daïs: Iliadic Warfare as Spectacle

Tobias Myers.

in Homer's Divine Audience

June 2019; p ublished online August 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 19067 words.

Chapter 2 explores how the Olympians and the Iliad’s audience are positioned as viewers for the warfare in Books 1–4, and their roles defined. The first section focuses on the gods. Homer...

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Ecphrasis and Iconoclasm

Peter Bing.

in Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 8220 words.

Chapter 19 examines how Palladas in his epigrams turned ecphrasis into a medium for contemplating the tension between the Greek literary and cultural heritage and the sociopolitical and...

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The Emergence of the Lyric Canon

Theodora A. Hadjimichael.

April 2019; p ublished online June 2019 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature; Classical Poetry. 368 pages.

This book explores the process of canonization of Greek lyric, as well as the textual transmission, and preservation of the lyric poems from the archaic period through to their emergence...

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The End of the Odyssey and of Revenge

Alexander C. Loney.

in The Ethics of Revenge and the Meanings of the Odyssey

April 2019; p ublished online May 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Poetry. 16144 words.

This chapter deals with the apparent problem of the end of the Odyssey. The poem could have ended with Odysseus’ and Penelope’s reunion, but it continues in order to provide a final...

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