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Classical Literature x Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE) x clear all

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America, Africa, and Classical Traditions

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 8741 words.

This chapter examines Morrison's challenge to the fabricated conception of classicism as a ‘pure’ boy of culture, as a European pedigree on which so many aspects of dominant American...

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Conclusion: Splitting Open the World

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 1210 words.

This chapter examines a Latin motto in Song of Solomon and the transformed version of Atlas in The Bluest Eye to discuss Morrison's reclamation or reinvention of the classical tradition,...

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Discovery, Conquest, and Settlement

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 6499 words.

This chapter argues that Morrison's engagement with the classical tradition in Tar Baby and Love enables her revisionary perspective on European constructions of America's origins. It...

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Fighting for Rights: from Emmett Till’s Murder to the Ronald Reagan Years

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 12175 words.

This chapter explores Morrison's stake in the Civil Rights Movement, the opposition to the Vietnam War, and in the experiences of women and/or the role of feminism within both these...

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In Search of Home: the 1920s–1950s

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 11850 words.

This chapter argues that in the novels that address the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s — Jazz, The Bluest Eye, and Sula — Morrison examines the opportunities and pitfalls that ‘freedom’ proscribed...

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Introduction

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 10790 words.

This introductory chapter positions the argument of this book in relation to recent scholarship in the field of ‘black classicism’. It posits the ‘strategic ambivalence’ of Morrison's...

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The New England Colonies and the Founding of the New Nation

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 12523 words.

This chapter examines Morrison's use of the classical tradition to challenge, in A Mercy and Paradise, the prevailing mythology that has come to define colonial New England and the founding...

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Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction

Tessa Roynon.

in Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 9573 words.

This chapter argues that in Beloved and Jazz, Morrison writes against the identification that the ‘Old South’, the Confederate cause, and the pro-slavery elements of American society...

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Toni Morrison and the Classical Tradition

Tessa Roynon.

October 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature; Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE). 240 pages.

This book explores Toni Morrison's widespread engagement with ancient Greek and the Roman tradition. It examines the ways in which classical myth, literature, history, social practice, and...

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