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Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook x Public Economics x General Aggregative Models x clear all

Fiscal consolidation after the Great Recession: the role of composition

Iván Kataryniuk and Javier Vallés.

in Oxford Economic Papers

April 2018; p ublished online July 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: General Aggregative Models; Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook; Public Economics. 9014 words.

Abstract

We have examined the fiscal consolidation episodes in a group of OECD countries from 2009 to 2014. The range of the estimated short-term fiscal...

The four fallacies of contemporary austerity policies: the lost Keynesian legacy

Robert Boyer.

in Cambridge Journal of Economics

January 2012; p ublished online January 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Public Economics; History of Economic Thought (1925 onwards); Economywide Country Studies; Money and Interest Rates; International Finance; National Budget, Deficit, and Debt; General Aggregative Models; Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook; Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance. 11726 words.

The contemporary wide-scale austerity measures are likely to fail in most countries. The first fallacy derives from the false diagnosis that the present crisis is the outcome of lax public...

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The UK’s Coalition government and heterodox economics

Michael Ellman.

in Cambridge Journal of Economics

September 2015; p ublished online August 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Economic Methodology; Wages, Compensation, and Labour Costs; National Budget, Deficit, and Debt; General Aggregative Models; Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook; Public Economics. 4683 words.

The UK Coalition government’s economic policy was primarily aimed at reducing the large fiscal deficit that it inherited, mainly by cutting expenditure. This was considered irrational by...