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Overview x Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE) x clear all

Abu Ghurob

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

A New Kingdom site, situated in Middle Egypt at the edge of the Faiyum, 3.75 kilometers (about 2.5 miles) due west of the point where the Bahr Yussuf branch of ...

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Abu Rowash

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Located in the continuation of Gebel el-Ghigiga, the western fringe of the Nile Valley (30°2′N, 31°4′E). The archaeological area of Abu Rowash, which belongs to the very northern part of ...

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Abusir

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

An archaeological locality on the western bank of the Nile River, approximately 25 kilometers (15 miles) southwest of Cairo (29°56′N, 31°13′E). Its name was derived from the Egyptian...

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Abydos

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

A site, ancient ʒbḏw, situated in the ancient Thinite nome (eighth Upper Egyptian nome) in southern Egypt (26°11′N 31°55′E). On the western side of the Nile, the site is on ...

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Administration

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

This is a three-part article covering State Administration, Provincial Administration, and Temple Administration.

Administration is the socioeconomic institution...

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Administrative Texts

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Result from a selective deployment of writing in control of resources on estates. Most surviving ancient Egyptian administrative texts derive from the two spheres of the state economy:...

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A-group

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

The archaeological designation for an indigenous Nubian culture; the term “A-Group” was introduced by George A. Reisner (1910) in his chronological model of the Nubian cultures, but it came...

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Ahmose-Nefertari

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Wife of the founder of the eighteenth dynasty, New Kingdom, Ahmose (r.1569–1545bce), and the mother of his son and successor, Amenhotpe I (r.1545–1525bce). She died at some point during the...

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Akh

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(Eg., ʒḫ),

a term that occurs regularly throughout ancient Egyptian secular and religious texts, represented by the crested ibis hieroglyph. The akh-concept appears to have no...

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Akhmīm

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) — Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(Panopolis, Πανω̑ν πόλις), metropolis of the Panopolite nome of Upper Egypt, a bishopric from the early 4th C. A church is mentioned in a text of 295–300 a.d. (P. Gen. ...

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Amarna Letters

Overview page. Subjects: Biblical Studies — Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Discovered in 1887, the archive of El‐Amarna in Egypt has yielded 379 cuneiform tablets that are among the most precious finds of Near Eastern archaeology. Tell el‐Amarna, located about 500...

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Amarna, Tell El-

Overview page. Subjects: Biblical Studies — Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Place on the eastern bank of the Nile near the village of Haggi Qandil, south of Cairo. For a time it was the capital of Egypt, and in 1887 a cache of inscribed tablets in Akkadian, the...

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Amasis

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies — Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

Became pharaoh (see Egypt, pre-ptolemaic; Saites) in 570 bc as champion of the native Egyptians against Apries. Though initially restricting Greek activities (e.g. channelling all trade...

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Amenemhat of Beni Hasan

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(fl. 1950 bce).

Amenemhat, the short form of whose name was Ameni, was the “Great Overlord of the Oryx nome” (the sixteenth Egyptian nome [province]) and the owner of tomb ...

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Amenemhet I

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(r. 1991–1962bce),

first king of the twelfth dynasty, Middle Kingdom. In the fictitious prophecy of Amenemhet I's accession, as told by the sage Neferti at King Sneferu's court,...

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Amenemhet III

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(r. 1843–1797bce),

sixth king of the twelfth dynasty, Middle Kingdom. He was the son of Senwosret III (r. 1878–1843bce), with whom he shared the throne for an unknown length of ...

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Amenhotep III

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(Glass: Akhnaten). King of the Pharaohs, husband of Queen Tye and father of Akhnaten. He has died just before the action begins.

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Amenhotep, Son of Hapu

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(c. 1430–1345?),

famous courtier during the reign of Amenhotpe III of the eighteenth dynasty. Amenhotep, son of Hapu, was born into a modest family during the reign of Thutmose III...

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Amenhotpe I

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(r. 1545–1525bce),

second king of the eighteenth dynasty, New Kingdom. Although certainly the son of the previous king Ahmose (r. 1569–1545bce) and his wife Ahmose-Nefertari, his...

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Amenhotpe II

Overview page. Subjects: Ancient History (Non-Classical, to 500 CE).

(r. 1454–1419bce),

sixth king of the eighteenth dynasty, New Kingdom. He was the son and successor of Thutmose III. Amenhotpe II's mother was Hatshepsut, the last Great Royal Wife...

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