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astrolabe

Overview page. Subjects: History.

An instrument used to make astronomical measurements, typically of the altitudes of celestial bodies, and in navigation for calculating latitude, before the development of the sextant. In...

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Davis's quadrant

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

Named by the French the English quadrant. John Davis (c.1550–1605), the illustrious English navigator and explorer of Elizabethan times who mounted three voyages in search of the North-West...

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kamal

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

From the Arabic word meaning guide, a navigation instrument of great antiquity. It was used by Arab seamen in the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean for at least six centuries for measuring the...

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navigation

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

N.

1 the process or activity of accurately ascertaining one's position and planning and following a route.

2 the passage of ships.

navig...

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quadrant

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

A mathematical instrument (type of sector) which measures angles of elevation or depression by means of a weighted plumb line on a 90° arc of a circle, used in astronomy ...

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Regiomontanus

Overview page. Subjects: Science and Mathematics — Early Modern History (1500 to 1700).

Name by which Johann Müller (1436–76), German astronomer and mathematician, was known. His tutor, the Austrian mathematician and astronomer Georg von Peurbach (1423–61), had begun a Latin...

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transom

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History — Warfare and Defence.

1 The athwartship timbers bolted to the sternpost of a ship to give it a flat stern. In the older square-rigged ships, particularly men-of-war, they were usually rather heavier...

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