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descender

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ascender

Overview page. Subjects: Computing.

Used in typography for the part of a lower case letter that is higher than the letter x. It is used in connection with the letters b, d, f, h, k, l, and t.

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baseline

Overview page. Subjects: Computing.

The line on which the letters of a text rest. Some letters, for example g, have portions known as descenders which fall below the baseline.

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bastarda type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Sub-category of gothic type, associated with vernacular languages, especially French, English, and German. It is based on scripts used in chanceries and for luxury MSS, written without many...

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black letter

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Sometimes used popularly as the English equivalent for the whole gothic type family, both early and more recent; the term also refers to scripts that developed from the 12th century. ...

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body of type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A type’s size, usually slightly more than the distance from ascender to descender. Formerly a measure of the physical rectangular block that formed the ‘body’ of a piece of type ...

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calligraphy

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

1. Decorative handwritten lettering.

2. The art of fine handwriting.

3. Calligraphic type: any typefaces designed to...

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flourish

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Ornamental penwork elaboration of a letter’s form, generally made by extending one of its elements, most commonly an ascender or a descender. See also calligraphy.

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gotico-rotunda

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A gothic script and short-lived type style, combining characteristics of gothic and humanist letterforms; sometimes categorized with rotunda. Fere-humanistica types are more legible than...

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half-uncial script

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

This script—used in antiquity (in developed form from the 4th century) and the early Middle Ages—was derived, like uncial, from roman cursive minuscule. Unlike uncial, it is a four-line...

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minuscule

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Of or in a small cursive script of the Roman alphabet, with ascenders and descenders, developed in the 7th century ad. The name comes (in the early 18th century) via French from Latin minus...

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rotunda type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Sub-category of gothic type. Based on rotunda, or round-hand, scripts, it derived from the Italian Bolognese script. Characterized by roundness in comparison to other gothics, especially...

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secretary hand

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

A style of handwriting used chiefly in legal documents from the 15th to the 17th centuries.

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size of type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

The ‘vertical’ dimension (head to foot in the printed image) of the type body (a physical measure in metal type, but merely conventional in photographic or digital systems), usually...

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textura type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Very formal sub-category of gothic type, based on textura script, which was written slowly, lifting the pen after each stroke. Curved portions of letters are formed from short, straight...

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titling type

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Formerly called two-line letters, titling type describes capital letters, usually roman, that have been cast to the full size of the type body, filling the space from the ascender line ...

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