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desensitization

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allergen

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A substance that will cause an allergic response (see allergy). Usually applied to substances such as pollens or insect venoms that cause immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions.

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behaviour therapy

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Psychology.

(bi-hayv-yer)

treatment based on the belief that psychological problems are the products of faulty learning and not the symptoms of an underlying disease. See also aversion...

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blocking antibody

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Medicine and Health.

An antibody used to prevent some other reaction taking place by physically masking a binding site, e.g. on a cell surface receptor.

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exposure

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

n. (in behaviour therapy) a method of treating fears and phobias that involves confronting the individual with the situation he has been avoiding, so allowing the fears to wane...

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fade

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry.

The waning of a response in the continued presence of an agonist. Compare desensitization.

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hay fever

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A common form of seasonal allergic rhinitis caused by inhaled allergens, usually pollens. There is acute nasal catarrh and conjunctivitis caused by a type I immediate hypersensitivity...

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phobia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A persistent, irrational fear of an object, event, activity, or situation called a phobic stimulus, resulting in a compelling desire to avoid it. The presence or anticipation of the phobic...

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relaxation therapy

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

Treatment by teaching patients to decrease their anxiety by reducing the tone in their muscles. This can be used by itself to help people cope with stressful situations or as a part of...

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response

Overview page. Subjects: Science and Mathematics — Medicine and Health.

n. the way in which the body or part of the body reacts to a stimulus. For example, a nerve impulse may produce the response of a contraction in a muscle that the nerve...

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sensitization

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences — Medicine and Health.

The increase in the likelihood that a particular and significant stimulus will produce a response in an animal repeatedly exposed to it. Compare extinction; habituation.

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sodium fluoride

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Chemistry.

A salt of sodium used to prevent tooth decay. It is administered by mouth or applied to the teeth as a paste, mouthwash, or gel. Taken in excess by mouth, it may cause digestive upsets and...

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tachyphylaxis

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Psychology.

n. a falling-off in the effects produced by a drug during continuous use or constantly repeated administration, common in drugs that act on the nervous system.

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