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inert gas

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argon

Overview page. Subjects: Meteorology and Climatology — Chemistry.

A natural, colourless, odourless, inertgas that is the third most abundant constituent of dry air (it comprises 0.93% of the Earth's atmosphere).

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helium

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry.

Symbol He. A colourless odourless gaseous nonmetallic element belonging to group 18 of the periodic table (see noble gases); a.n. 2; r.a.m. 4.0026; d. 0.178 g dm−3; m.p. –272.2°C (at 20...

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krypton

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Environmental Science.

An inert gas, atomic number 36, that occurs at low concentrations (1 part in 670 000) in the atmosphere.

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neon

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Environmental Science.

A colourless inert gas, atomic number 10, that occurs at low concentrations (1.8 × 10−3 per cent by volume) in the atmosphere.

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radon

Overview page. Subjects: Environmental Science.

A radioactive inert gas, atomic number 86, the decay product of radium. The most stable isotope, radon-222, has a half-life of 3.825 days. Relatively high concentrations of radon may occur...

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rare gas

Overview page. Subjects: Environmental Science.

A gas (such as helium or neon) that is inert or unreactive, does not readily take part in chemical reactions, and is thus very stable. See also inert gas, noble gas.

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xenon

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry.

An inert gas, atomic number 54, that occurs at extremely low concentration (8.0×10−6 per cent by volume) in the atmosphere.

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