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Melanie Klein

(1882—1960) psychoanalyst

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ambivalence

Overview page. Subjects: Science and Mathematics — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

n. (in psychology) the condition of holding opposite feelings (such as love and hate) for the same person or object. This can cause relationship difficulties and pathological...

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Anna Freud

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies — Contemporary History (Post 1945).

(1895–1982)

Austrianpsychoanalyst and youngest daughter of the founder of psychoanalysisSigmund Freud. Close to her father, she recounted her dreams to him from a young age (many...

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body without organs

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A core concept in Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's account of the genesis of the schizophrenic subject. The concept underwent a number of transformations from its first usage in...

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depressive position

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

In Kleinian analysis, a modality of object relations occurring after the paranoid-schizoid position, from about the fourth month until the end of the first year of life, and sometimes...

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desiring-machine

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

The actual mechanism of desire according to Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Deleuze and Guattari give as their example the machine formed by the child and the maternal breast. The idea...

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Donald Woods Winnicott

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

(1896–1971)

A British paediatrician and psychoanalyst whose work on the mother-baby relationship directed attention to the infant's environment and to ‘good-enough mothering’....

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ego psychology

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Social Sciences.

A school of psychoanalysis based on the analysis of the ego, founded in 1939 by the Austrian-born US psychoanalyst Heinz Hartmann (1894–1970), including the US-based German psychologist...

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Freudian

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Medicine and Health.

adj. relating to or describing the work and ideas of Austrian psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), inventor of psychoanalytic theory: applied particularly to the school of...

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infancy

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Sociology.

In lay usage, an imprecisely defined period from birth to the age when a child is toilet trained and/or can feed, dress, and wash without the help of a parent or older sibling....

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internalization

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

1 The acceptance and incorporation of the beliefs or standards of others. For example, internalization occurs when individual team members adopt the mores of the team in which...

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introjection

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

n. (in psychoanalysis) the process of adopting, or of believing that one possesses, the qualities of another person. This can be a form of defence mechanism.

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misogyny

Overview page. Subjects: History.

The hatred of women. Misogyny plays a central role in many feminist accounts of patriarchy (see feminism). Major theorists of misogyny and its social consequences include Kate Millet,...

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object

Overview page. Subjects: Media Studies — Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

1. n. In everyday usage, something that can be seen and touched.

2. n. (psychology) A person, goal, or thing toward which a...

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object relations

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

In psychoanalysis, the emotional bonds that people form with instinctual objects, in contradistinction to interest in and love of oneself. It is given expression through capacity to form...

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Object Relations Test

Overview page. Subjects: Sociology.

A projective test, developed during the 1950s at the Tavistock Clinic in London, and based on the psychoanalytic theories of Melanie Klein. Klein argued that children introject as ‘good...

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object-relations theory

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences.

A theory of object relations developed in the UK by the British-based Austrian psychoanalyst Melanie Klein (1882–1960), the English psychoanalyst Donald Woods Winnicott (1896–1971), the...

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paranoid-schizoid position

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

In Kleinian analysis, a mode of object relations occurring during the first 4 months of life, before the depressive position, recurring occasionally in later childhood and adulthood, and...

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part object

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

In Kleinian analysis, any part of a person that serves as an instinctual object satisfying another person's sexual instinct (3), the first instance in human development being the mother's...

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projection

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

1 In psychoanalysis, a defence mechanism in which intolerable feelings, impulses, or thoughts are falsely attributed to other people. Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) developed the...

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projective identification

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

In Kleinian analysis, a fantasy (2) in which one inserts oneself, or part of oneself, into an instinctual object in order to possess it, control it, or harm it. The British-based Austrian...

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