Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 21-40 of 208 items for:

Buddha-dharma x clear all

Zushi

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 17 words.

(Jap.).

A small shrine or sanctuary dedicated to the Buddha or to a transmitter of dharma.

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dharmavinaya (P.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 149 words.

In Sanskrit, the “teaching” (dharma) and “discipline” (vinaya) expounded by the Buddha and recommended to his

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triratna

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 14 words.

In Sanskrit, the “three jewels” of the Buddha, dharma, and saṃgha. See ratnatraya.

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Buddha-sāsana

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Buddha-discipline, a term embracing the practice and teaching of the Buddha, and thus is a name for ‘Buddhism’: see also BUDDHA-DHARMA.

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Ichimi-shabyo

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

(Jap., ‘one taste from bowl’).

The authentic transmission of the buddha-dharma in Zen, from a master to his dharma-successor (hassu).

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Ishin-denshin

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 30 words.

(Jap., ‘transmitting mind through mind’).

Zen recognition of the transmission of buddha-dharma from master to pupil and to dharma-successors (

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Ichimi-shabyo

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 21 words.

(Jap., ‘one taste from bowl’).

The authentic transmission of the buddha-dharma in Zen, from a master to his dharma-successor (

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Buddhism

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Western term which became established in popular usage in the 1830s to refer to the teachings of the Buddha. There is no direct equivalent for this term in Sanskrit or Pāli. Instead,...

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antaradhāna

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 253 words.

In Pāli, “disappearance [of the Buddha’s teachings].” According to the Pāli commentaries, the true dharma (saddhamma) or teaching (sāsana) of

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dharmaśarīra (T.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 201 words.

In Sanskrit, “relics of the dharma [body]”; the Buddha’s incorporeal relics, viz., his scriptures, verses, and doctrines, or the immutable

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Zushi

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

(Jap.).

A small shrine or sanctuary dedicated to the Buddha or to a transmitter of dharma.

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kyabdro

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 58 words.

(Tib., skyabs-'gro).

Tibetan term for the act of taking refuge in the three jewels (the Buddha, the Dharma,

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triśaraṇa

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 146 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, tisaraṇa).

The ‘three refuges’, namely the Buddha, Dharma, and Saṃgha, particularly when used as a

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Pratyekabuddha

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 105 words.

(Skt.; Pāli, Paccekabuddha).

A ‘private’ or ‘solitary’ Buddha, one who remainins in seclusion and does not teach the Dharma

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Four Noble Truths

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 392 words.

The four foundational propositions of Buddhist doctrine ennunciated by the Buddha in his first sermon (Dharma-cakra-pravartana sūtra). The

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Mallikā

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 27 words.

Senior wife of King Pasenadi of Kosala. A devotee of the Buddha she was instructed in the Dharma by

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Buddhism

W. J. Johnson.

in A Dictionary of Hinduism

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Hinduism. 373 words.

A Western term coined in the 19th century to refer to the teachings, or dharma, of the Buddha,

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Homon

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 37 words.

(Jap., ‘dharma gate’).

The teachings of the Buddha. In the Four Great Vows (shiguseigan) of Zen, (part

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Three Jewels

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 68 words.

(Skt., triratna; Pāli, tiratana Jap., sanki).

In Buddhism, the three most precious things, Buddha, dharma, and

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Tekiden

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 25 words.

(Jap.).

‘Authorized transmission’ in Zen Buddhism of the buddha-dharma from a master to his pupil (cf. hassu), confirmed by

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