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Trobriand cricket

Alan Tomlinson.

in A Dictionary of Sports Studies

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Outdoor Recreation. 144 words.

A version of cricket played in the Trobriand Islands, in the South Pacific, off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Cricket was introduced to the islanders by a British missionary in ...

CRICKET, harming

Iona Opie and Moira Tatem.

in A Dictionary of Superstitions

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Popular Beliefs and Controversial Knowledge. 209 words.

1787 GROSE Provincial Glossary Superstitions 64. It is held extremely unlucky to kill a cricket … perhaps from the idea

French cricket

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 48 words.

A simplified form of cricket without stumps in which the ‘bowler’ gets the ‘batsman’ out if the ball hits the

Samoan cricket

Tony Deverson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealandisms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 65 words.

noun an informal variety of cricket originating in Samoa, with no set number of players in a side (also called

women's cricket

Alan Tomlinson.

in A Dictionary of Sports Studies

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Outdoor Recreation. 531 words.

An eleven-a-side bat-and-ball game played under the auspices of the International Cricket Council. Women played the game recreationally as early as ...

Pyjama cricket

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 26 words.

A derisive term for professional one-day limited-overs cricket, in which since around 1980 the players have worn coloured clothing rather

pyjama cricket

G. A. Wilkes.

in Stunned Mullets & Two-pot Screamers: A Dictionary of Australian Colloquialisms

January 2008; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 106 words.

One-day cricket [from coloured uniforms worn by players, and because it is sometimes played at night] 1982 Sun-Herald (Sydney) 31

Cricket Max

Tony Deverson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of New Zealandisms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 20 words.

noun historical a short-lived fast-action version of cricket with innings of ten overs each (a forerunner of Twenty20).

Trobriand cricket

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure.

A version of cricket played in the Trobriand Islands, in the South Pacific, off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Cricket was introduced to the islanders by a British missionary in 1903, as a...

See overview in Oxford Index

women's cricket

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure.

An eleven-a-side bat-and-ball game played under the auspices of the International Cricket Council. Women played the game recreationally as early as 1677 in England, when the wife of the...

See overview in Oxford Index

cricket / ~’s / ~s n

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 13 words.

=

sp cricket2 / crickets1 / crickets4

Lord's cricket ground

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 62 words.

home of the Marylebone Cricket Club and of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, was opened in 1787 by Thomas Lord

Lord's cricket ground

John Cannon and Robert Crowcroft.

in A Dictionary of British History

P ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 62 words.

home of the Marylebone Cricket Club and of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, was opened in 1787 by Thomas Lord...

Lord's Cricket Ground

A. D. Mills.

in A Dictionary of London Place-Names

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 47 words.

(in St John's Wood)

Westminster. Famous headquarters of English cricket owned by the MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club), named after

Lord's cricket ground

J. A. Cannon.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 72 words.

home of the Marylebone Cricket Club and of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, was opened in 1787 by Thomas Lord

cricket bats n.

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 24 words.

the teeth.

2002 Pete's Aussie Sl. Home Page [Internet] cricket bats: the tats, teeth.

Marylebone Cricket Club

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 56 words.

The world's premier cricket club. The MCC was founded in 1787 by a group of noblemen and based at Thomas

Marylebone Cricket Club

John Cannon and Robert Crowcroft.

in A Dictionary of British History

P ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 58 words.

The world's premier cricket club. The MCC was founded in 1787 by a group of noblemen and based at Thomas ...

Crickets (rock 'n' roll)

Edited by Colin Larkin.

in Encyclopedia of Popular Music

January 2006; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Music. 898 words.

Formed in the early months of 1957, the Crickets have continued to record and tour as a group ever since

Crickets and Grasshoppers

in The New Encyclopedia of Insects and their Allies

January 2002; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences. 4804 words.

THE CRICKETS AND GRASSHOPPERS OF THE large order Orthoptera are noted for jumping (to escape predators) and singing (to potential