Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 21-40 of 242 items for:

anaphora x clear all

Refine by subject

 

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

anaphora

Ian Buchanan.

in A Dictionary of Critical Theory

February 2018; p ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 116 words.

A means of linking two sentences, paragraphs, or indeed thoughts, by means of a repetition of a part of the previous utterance. In the example, ‘John came into the room. He picked up his...

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday.

in A Dictionary of Media and Communication

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Media Studies. 103 words.

1. In *rhetoric and poetry, emphasis created through the repetition of an initial word or phrase. For example, the

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Daniel Chandler and Rod Munday.

in A Dictionary of Media and Communication

P ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Media Studies. 103 words.

1. In rhetoric and poetry, emphasis created through the repetition of an initial word or phrase. For example, the phrase

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 148 words.

A rhetorical device involving the repetition of a word or group of words in successive clauses. It is commonly found

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Edited by Tom McArthur.

in Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 198 words.

1 A term in grammar and linguistics for referring back in a stretch of language, as with it in: ‘Although

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Paul Elbourne.

in Definite Descriptions

June 2013; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Linguistics. 3741 words.

A number of authors have observed that definite descriptions can havecovarying interpretations. In fact they can appear in positions, andyield up interpretations, associated with both...

Go to Oxford Scholarship Online »  abstract

Anaphora

Brenda Townsend Hall.

in ELT Journal

October 1997; p ublished online October 1997 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Language Acquisition; Teaching English as a Foreign or Second Language; Language Learning (Specific Skills); Language Teaching Theory and Methods. 0 words.

Go to Oxford Journals »  abstract

Anaphora

Andrea Grün-Oesterreich.

in Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 128 words.

(Lat. relatio),

called by Puttenham (The Arte of English Poesie, 1589) “figure of report,” is an

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Irénée-Henri Dalmais.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 166 words.

Literally “to carry upwards”. In the Eastern liturgies it designates the Prayer of Oblation or Eucharistic Prayer (in Syriac, Qurbana

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 103 words.

1 (First recorded in the 16c.) In rhetoric, the repetition of the same word or phrase in several successive clauses: e.g. ...

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Joseph Aoun and Stephen Neale.

in International Encyclopedia of Linguistics

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 4092 words.

This entry includes the following sub-entries: Formal Grammar Logical Semantics

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 15 words.

(‘carrying back’), the repetition of the same word or phrase in several successive clauses.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 35 words.

[Greek, ‘carrying back’] 

The repetition of the same word or phrase in several successive clauses; for instance, ‘Awake up, my glory; awake, lute and harp; I myself will awake...

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 168 words.

The relation between a pronoun and another unit, in the same or in an earlier sentence, that supplies its referent.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 210 words.

[əˈnafərə] The relation between a pronoun and another unit, in the same or in an earlier sentence, that supplies its referent. E.g. in ...

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Edited by E. A. Livingstone.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Christianity. 25 words.

The name used in the E. Church of the central prayer in the Eucharistic liturgy, known in the W. as

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

Edited by E. A. Livingstone.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

January 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Christianity. 25 words.

The name used in the E. Church of the central prayer in the Eucharistic liturgy, known in the W. as

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Anaphora

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 41 words.

(Gk., ‘offering’).

The central part of the Christian eucharist, known in the West as the canon), and in

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 35 words.

The repetition of the same word or phrase in several successive clauses; for instance, ‘Awake up, my glory; awake, lute and harp; I myself will awake right early’ (Psalms 57: 9)....

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

anaphora

in The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 30 words.

repetition of the same word or phrase at the start of successive clauses or lines:This blessèd plot, this earth,

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page