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Danaŭs

Edited by John Roberts.

in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 282 words.

Danaus was the son of Belus, the brother of Aegyptus, eponym of the Egyptians, and the brother‐in‐law of Phoenix, eponym

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Aetolus

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 98 words.

eponym of the Aetolians. *Endymion, king of *Elis, had three sons: Paeon, Epeius, and Aetolus. He

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Dryope

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 45 words.

daughter of *Dryops or of Eurytus, was mother by *Apollo of Amphissus, eponym of *Amphissa. She

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Munichus (later Munychus)

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 87 words.

eponym of *Munichia (1), the acropolis of *Piraeus, where he received refugees from Boeotian

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Acarnan

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 88 words.

eponym of *Acarnania. He was the son, with Amphoterus, of Callirhoë (the daughter of Acheloüs) and

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Orchomenus (mythological)

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 77 words.

(a) *Eponym of the Boeotian *Orchomenus (1), a vague genealogical figure. He is son of

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Nauplius

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 162 words.

eponym of Nauplia near *Argos (1); son of *Poseidon and *Amymone. (2) His descendant, often

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Hyrnetho/Hyrnatho

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 166 words.

Eponym of the Argive (see argos (1)) tribe Hyrnathioi (who were the non-*Dorian, or not

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Dirce

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 93 words.

eponym of the spring/river at *Thebes (1). She was done to death by *Amphion and

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Étar

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Father of Étaín Fholtfhind, in some versions; probably the eponym of Benn Étair, the Hill of Howth.

See overview in Oxford Index

Hansen disease

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics.

The preferred term for leprosy (q.v.). The eponym honors the scientist who discovered the leprosy bacterium.

See overview in Oxford Index

Lugaid Conmac

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 34 words.

Sometime eponym of Connemara, in place of the usual eponymous founder, Conmac, a by-blow of Medb and Fergus

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Ernmas

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 72 words.

Mother of divinities. According to some texts she is the mother of the divine eponyms of Ireland, Ériu, Banba

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Fódla

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 127 words.

Irish goddess, one of the three divine eponyms of Ireland, along with her sisters Banba and Ériu, and

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Banba

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 160 words.

A poetic name for Ireland in early times, one of a divine trio of eponyms for Ireland along with Ériu

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Ériu

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 386 words.

One of three sisters, divine eponyms and tutelary goddesses of Ireland, along with Banba and Fódla; sometimes Ériu is

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Brutus

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 53 words.

Contrived eponym and progenitor of the British people, as found in Geoffrey of Monmouth (1136). A leader of

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Étar

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 23 words.

Father of Étaín Fholtfhind, in some versions; probably the eponym of Benn Étair, the Hill of Howth.

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Niall Noígiallach

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 949 words.

[of the Nine Hostages; Nine Hostager]. Ancestor and eponym of the Uí Néill dynasty that dominated Ireland for six centuries;

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Hansen disease

Robert C. King, William D. Stansfield and Pamela K. Mulligan.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 18 words.

the preferred term for leprosy (q.v.). The eponym honors the scientist who discovered the leprosy bacterium.

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