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Mood Disorders

Allison G. Harvey, Candice Alfano and Greg Clarke.

in The Oxford Handbook of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Sleep and Behavior

November 2013; p ublished online December 2013 .

Article. Subjects: Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Clinical Psychology. 13660 words.

Mood disorders are prevalent and concerning, particularly among children and adolescents. Sleep disturbances, particularly insomnia and hypersomnia (but also delayed sleep phase and sleep...

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Sentence mood

Paul Portner.

in Mood

January 2018; p ublished online December 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Semantics; Linguistics. 52654 words.

Sentence mood is the linguistic category which marks the fundamental conversational function, or “sentential force,” of a sentence. Exemplified by the universal types of declarative,...

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Mood disorders

Philip Cowen, Paul Harrison and Tom Burns.

in Shorter Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry

August 2012; p ublished online November 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Psychiatry. 33562 words.

Chapter 10 discusses mood disorders, including clinical features, transcultural features, classification and differential diagnosis, epidemiology and aetiology, course and prognosis, acute...

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Mood Disorders

Licínia Ganança, David A. Kahn and Maria A. Oquendo.

in Psychiatry

June 2014; p ublished online August 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Psychiatry. 26343 words.

This chapter discusses the mood disorders. Major depressive disorder is characterized by neurovegetative changes, anhedonia, and suicidal ideation. Persistent depressive disorder is a...

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mood swings

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

It is common knowledge that what you eat can affect how you feel and, conversely, that how you feel can affect what you eat. Many people feel depressed, agitated, and tense before eating...

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Mood Disorders

Alan D. Valentine.

in Psycho-Oncology

December 2014; p ublished online March 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Palliative Medicine; Psychiatry. 2085 words.

Mood disorders are associated with adverse clinical outcomes, increased costs, and increased emotional burden for patients and caregivers. The differential diagnosis of depression-like...

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Mood disorders

Jayesh Kamath and Ajay Shah.

in Oxford Textbook of Correctional Psychiatry

March 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Psychiatry; Forensic Psychiatry. 4425 words.

Depression and Bipolar Disorder comprise a substantial percentage of all psychiatric care in the community. This is also the case in correctional settings. Diagnosis and treatment may vary...

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Disruptive Mood

Argyris Stringaris and Eric Taylor.

March 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Book. Subjects: Psychiatry; Paediatrics. 176 pages.

Providing both a clinical and scientific perspective on irritability in children, this new online resource is a timely look at recent developments in the field. Currently there is a lively...

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Mood Disorders

Jennifer Goldman.

in A Case-Based Approach to Emergency Psychiatry

May 2016; p ublished online July 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Psychiatry; Emergency Medicine. 6695 words.

Mood disorders are a common cause of presentations to the emergency department. Patients may present either because they are severely depressed or due to manic symptoms. Four cases are...

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Mood disorders

Terry Robinson and Jane E. Scullion.

in Old Age Psychiatry

P ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Old Age Psychiatry. 7647 words.

Mood disorders—an overview - Diagnosing depression - Depression—epidemiology - Special presentations of depression in older people: 1, Pseudodementia - Special presentations of depression in...

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euthymic mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 35 words.

A mood (1) within the temperate range, without the characteristics of depressed mood, dysphoric mood, elevated

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mood / ~s n

David Crystal.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

March 2016; p ublished online October 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Shakespeare Studies and Criticism. 33 words.

=

sp mood9, moode10 / moodes2, moods2

rh 1 blood LC 201, MND 3.2.74

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depressed mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 10 words.

A mood (1) state characterized by depression.

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depressed mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 10 words.

A *mood (1) state characterized by *depression.

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euthymic mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 35 words.

A *mood (1) within the temperate range, without the characteristics of *depressed mood, *dysphoric

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Mood and Ethics

Carl Plantinga.

in Screen Stories

June 2018; p ublished online May 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 6996 words.

Our understanding of the moral psychology of screen stories is incomplete and underdeveloped unless we examine the ethical significance of moods, which are quite different than emotions....

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mood-congruent

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Of or relating to a delusion or hallucination whose content is consistent with the depressed or manic mood of the person experiencing it. Compare mood-incongruent.

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mood-incongruent

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Of or relating to a delusion or hallucination whose content is inconsistent with the depressed or manic mood of the person experiencing it. Compare mood-congruent.

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elevated mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 28 words.

A heightened mood characterized by feelings of euphoria, elation, and well-being. A person in such a mood may describe the

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elevated mood n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 28 words.

A heightened mood characterized by feelings of euphoria, elation, and well-being. A person in such a mood may describe the

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