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1848 x British History x clear all

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1848

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

The most celebrated and widespread of the 19th-c. European revolutions proved also a crucial turning point in the Italian Risorgimento. Beginning with an insurrection in Palermo in January,...

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Public Health Act (1848)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 76 words.

1848.

An Act of Parliament for England and Wales (11 & 12 Vic. c. 63) was carried following an

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Public Health Act (1848)

Edward Royle.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 122 words.

1848.

An Act of Parliament for England and Wales (11 & 12 Vic. c. 63) was carried following an

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Frederica, Princess (1848–1926)

Torsten Riotte.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

P ublished online October 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History; Modern History (1700 to 1945). 1104 words.

Frederica, Princess (1848–1926), was born Frederica Sophia Marie Henrietta Amelia Theresa in Hanover on 9 January 1848, the eldest daughter of George, crown prince of Hanover—from 1851 king...

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Grace, W. G. (1848–1915)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 81 words.

(1848–1915).

Grace was probably the greatest sporting hero of late Victorian and Edwardian Britain, his bulky form and

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Parry, Sir Hubert (1848–1918)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 85 words.

(1848–1918).

Together with Charles Stanford, whose music he detested, Parry inspired what is called the ‘English musical

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Stephenson, George (1781–1848)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 94 words.

(1781–1848).

Son of a colliery workman, without schooling, George Stephenson became one of the most famous of all

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Barrow, Sir John (1764–1848)

Roy C. Bridges.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 127 words.

(1764–1848).

Promoter of exploration. As a member of Lord *Macartney's staff, Barrow was on the famous embassy

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Parry, Sir Hubert (1848–1918)

Bernard Porter.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 167 words.

(1848–1918).

Together with Charles *Stanford, whose music he detested, Parry inspired what is called the ‘English musical

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Davidson, Randall (1848–1930)

William M. Marshall.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 215 words.

(1848–1930).

Archbishop of Canterbury. Born a Scottish presbyterian in Edinburgh and educated at Trinity College, Oxford, Davidson was

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Grace, W. G. (1848–1915)

J. A. Cannon.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 105 words.

(1848–1915).

Grace was probably the greatest sporting hero of late Victorian and Edwardian Britain, his bulky form and

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Stephenson, George (1781–1848)

Norman McCord.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 153 words.

(1781–1848).

Son of a colliery workman, without schooling, George Stephenson became one of the most famous of all

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Pre-Raphaelites (1848–c. 1854)

June Cochrane.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 203 words.

(1848–c. 1854).

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, also known by the initials PRB, was a short-lived, essentially English, association

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Latimer, Lewis (1848–1928)

in The Oxford Companion to Black British History

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History; History.

(1848–1928).

African‐American scientist and inventor who worked in Britain. Lewis Latimer's parents were Rebecca and George Latimer,

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Louise, Princess, duchess of Argyll (1848–1939)

Mark Stocker.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History; Modern History (1700 to 1945). 1189 words.

Louise, Princess, duchess of Argyll (1848–1939), was born Louise Caroline Alberta at Buckingham Palace, London, on 18 March 1848, the sixth of Queen Victoria's nine children. Although she...

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Balfour, Arthur James, 1st earl of (1848–1930)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 632 words.

(1848–1930).

Prime minister. Essentially a mid‐Victorian, Arthur Balfour seems miscast as a 20th‐cent. prime minister. Naturally fitted

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Melbourne, William Lamb, 2nd Viscount (1779–1848)

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 489 words.

(1779–1848).

Prime minister. In some respects Melbourne was an essentially 18th‐cent. figure: his idea of government was

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Melbourne, William Lamb, 2nd Viscount (1779–1848)

J. A. Cannon.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 965 words.

(1779–1848).

Prime minister. Melbourne was such an agreeable man—perhaps the most pleasant prime minister since Lord *North—that

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Balfour, Arthur James, 1st earl of (1848–1930)

Martin Pugh.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 754 words.

(1848–1930).

Prime minister. Essentially a mid-Victorian, Arthur Balfour seems miscast as a 20th-cent. prime minister. He was the

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Lord John Russell and Parliamentary Reform, 1848–67

Robert Saunders.

in The English Historical Review

December 2005; p ublished online December 2005 .

Journal Article. Subjects: British History; World History; European History; International History. 13309 words.

Between 1848 and 1867, the reform of parliament was one of the key subjects of political debate in Britain. The central figure in this debate was Lord John Russell, but his approach to...

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Policing Chartism, 1839–1848: The Role of the ‘Specials’ Reconsidered

RE Swift.

in The English Historical Review

June 2007; p ublished online June 2007 .

Journal Article. Subjects: British History; World History; European History; International History. 14789 words.

Among the many monographs, journal articles and theses devoted to the study of Chartism, one is hard-pressed to find a single study of the role of the Special Constabulary in the policing...

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