Oxford Index Search Results

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Molecular Evolution of Seminal Proteins in Field Crickets

José A. Andrés, Luana S. Maroja, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, Willie J. Swanson and Richard G. Harrison.

in Molecular Biology and Evolution

August 2006; p ublished online May 2006 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Molecular and Cell Biology. 8543 words.

In sexually reproducing organisms, male ejaculates are complex traits that are potentially subject to many different selection pressures. Recent experimental evidence supports the hypothesis...

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Male dominance and immunocompetence in a field cricket

Markus J. Rantala and Raine Kortet.

in Behavioral Ecology

March 2004; p ublished online March 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 3588 words.

Female preference for dominant males has been found in many species, and it is generally thought that winners of male-male competition are of superior quality. Success in contests probably...

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Precopulatory choice for cues of material benefits in tree crickets

Luc F. Bussière, Andrew P. Clark and Darryl T. Gwynne.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2005; p ublished online August 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 5371 words.

The relative importance of direct and indirect benefits models of mate choice is a central question in sexual selection, but separating the two models is very difficult because high quality...

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Nuptial gifts protect male bell crickets from female aggressive behavior

Takashi Kuriwada and Eiiti Kasuya.

in Behavioral Ecology

March 2012; p ublished online November 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 3284 words.

One of the proposed functions of nuptial gifts is to protect males from female aggressive behavior during courtship and copulation. However, there is no direct evidence supporting this...

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Inbreeding and measures of immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus

Jean M. Drayton and Michael D. Jennions.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2011; p ublished online March 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 5238 words.

Studies of sexual selection and immunity in invertebrates often assay components of the immune system (e.g., encapsulation response, hemocyte counts) to estimate disease resistance. Because...

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Sexually transmitted parasites and host mating behavior in the decorated cricket

Lien T. Luong and Harry K. Kaya.

in Behavioral Ecology

July 2005; p ublished online May 2005 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 5026 words.

Sexually transmitted diseases play a potentially important role in the ecology and evolution of host mating behavior. Here, we use a sexually transmitted nematode-cricket (Mehdinema...

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Cryptic female choice predicated on wing dimorphism in decorated crickets

Scott K. Sakaluk.

in Behavioral Ecology

May 1997; p ublished online May 1997 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 0 words.

Male decorated crickets, Gryttodes sigllatus, normally lack bind wings and are incapable of flight (short-winged males), but occasionally exhibit fully developed hind wings that make...

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Sexually transmitted nematodes affect spermatophylax production in the cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus

Lien T. Luong and Harry K. Kaya.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2005; p ublished online July 2004 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 4448 words.

Parasites can influence various aspects of host reproduction and mating, including spermatophore production. In the cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, males transfer to females a two-part...

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Spectral niche segregation and community organization in a tropical cricket assemblage

Arne K.D. Schmidt, Heiner Römer and Klaus Riede.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2013; p ublished online November 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 10017 words.

In species-rich biomes such as tropical rainforests, the efficiency of intraspecific acoustic communication will strongly depend on the degree of signal overlap. Signal interference...

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Personality-related survival and sampling bias in wild cricket nymphs

Petri T. Niemelä, Ella Z. Lattenkamp and Niels J. Dingemanse.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2015; p ublished online April 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 10202 words.

The study of adaptive individual behavior (“animal personality”) focuses on whether individuals differ consistently in (suites of correlated) behavior(s) and whether individual-level...

Reduced reproductive effort in male field crickets infested with parasitoid fly larvae

Gita R. Kolluru, Marlene Zuk and Mark A. Chappell.

in Behavioral Ecology

September 2002; p ublished online September 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 7367 words.

Some populations of the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus are parasitized by the phonotactic fly Ormia ochracea. Flies locate crickets by their song and deposit larvae onto them. The...

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Death comes suddenly to the unprepared: singing crickets, call fragmentation, and parasitoid flies

Pie Müller and Daniel Robert.

in Behavioral Ecology

September 2002; p ublished online September 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 6383 words.

Male field crickets are subject to a delicate dilemma because their songs simultaneously attract mates and acoustic predators. It has been suggested that in response, crickets have...

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Convergent song preferences between female field crickets and acoustically orienting parasitoid flies

William E. Wagner.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 1996; p ublished online January 1996 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 0 words.

Traits that increase the attractiveness of males to females often make them more conspicuous to predators. In the field cricket (Gryllus lineaticeps), males are attacked by parasitoid...

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Resource allocation trade-off between sperm quality and immunity in the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

Leigh W. Simmons.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2012; p ublished online October 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 4896 words.

Mounting an immune response is costly, requiring an animal to draw on its limited nutrient pool at a cost to future growth and reproduction. A trade-off between immunity and reproduction is...

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Environmental and social influences on calling effort in the prairie mole cricket (Gryllotalpa major)

Peggy S. M. Hill.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 1998; p ublished online January 1998 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 0 words.

Sexual advertisement in the form of acoustic display is energetically expensive. Calling effort, or metabolic energy expended specifically for advertisement, is adjusted in some species in...

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Water-seeking behavior in worm-infected crickets and reversibility of parasitic manipulation

Fleur Ponton, Fernando Otálora-Luna, Thierry Lefèvre, Patrick M. Guerin, Camille Lebarbenchon, David Duneau, David G. Biron and Frédéric Thomas.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2011; p ublished online February 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 5534 words.

One of the most fascinating examples of parasite-induced host manipulation is that of hairworms, first, because they induce a spectacular “suicide” water-seeking behavior in their...

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How cricket frog females deal with a noisy world: habitat-related differences in auditory tuning

Klaudia Witte, Hamilton E. Farris, Michael J. Ryan and Walter Wilczynski.

in Behavioral Ecology

May 2005; p ublished online February 2005 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 7750 words.

Cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) occupy a variety of acoustically different habitats ranging from pine forest to open grassland. There is geographic variation in their calls and the tuning of...

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Courtship song's role during female mate choice in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus

Darren Rebar, Nathan W. Bailey and Marlene Zuk.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2009; p ublished online October 2009 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 6133 words.

Sexual signals consist of multiple components, each of which can contribute to mating decisions. Male field crickets use 2 acoustic signals in the context of mating: a calling song that...

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Does acoustic adaptation drive vertical stratification? A test in a tropical cricket assemblage

Manjari Jain and Rohini Balakrishnan.

in Behavioral Ecology

March 2012; p ublished online November 2011 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 6199 words.

In species-rich assemblages, differential utilization of vertical space can be driven by resource availability. For animals that communicate acoustically over long distances under...

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The strength of postcopulatory sexual selection within natural populations of field crickets

Leigh W. Simmons and Maxine Beveridge.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2010; p ublished online August 2010 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Evolutionary Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology and Animal Sciences. 5408 words.

Sperm competition and cryptic female choice are likely to exert strong postcopulatory sexual selection and may amplify or ameliorate selection acting via male mating success. However,...

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