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a-hull

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

The condition of a sailing vessel which is obliged, because of heavy weather, to heave to under bare poles with its helm a-lee in order to ride out the storm.

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Bottom

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 424 words.

Of a ship, the lower part of the hull, usually below the waterline. Hence the hull itself or the whole

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Paulin, Tom (b.1949)

Edited by Sean McMahon and Jo O'Donoghue.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

January 2006; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 221 words.

He was born in Leeds but grew up in Belfast. Educated at Hull and Lincoln College, Oxford, he is a

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tosher

Edited by Russ Willey.

in Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 38 words.

A man who in the 19th century stole copper from the hulls of ships moored in the Thames. Also

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bulge

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 49 words.

†wallet, pouch XIII; bottom of a ship's hull XVII; (f. the vb.) protuberance XVIII. — (O)F. bouge — L.

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bilge

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 24 words.

bottom of a ship's hull XV; filth collecting there XIX (cf. bilge water XVIII). prob. var. of BULGE, used

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rake

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 46 words.

(naut.) projection of hull at stem and stern beyond the keel line. XVII. f. rake vb. (XVII) have a rake,

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A

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 27 words.

used in the symbol A1, applied in Lloyd's Register to ships in first-class condition in respect of hull (A)

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Bilge water

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 34 words.

The filthy water that collects in a ship’s bilge, this being the part of the hull where the sides curve

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plimsoll

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 34 words.

P.('s) line, mark load-line on the hull of a ship XIX; rubber-soled sports shoe XX. Name of Samuel Plimsoll

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bottom

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 68 words.

A lowest surface or part OE.; valley, dell (surviving in place-names); foundation XV;

B keel of ship, hull XVI. OE.

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catamaran

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 25 words.

[E17th]

This word describes a yacht or other boat with twin hulls in parallel; it is from Tamil kattumaram,

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hive

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 30 words.

[Old English]

This Germanic word is probably related to Old Norse húfr ‘hull of a ship’ and Latin cupa ‘tub,

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