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a-hull

Overview page. Subjects: Maritime History.

The condition of a sailing vessel which is obliged, because of heavy weather, to heave to under bare poles with its helm a-lee in order to ride out the storm.

See overview in Oxford Index

Bottom

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 424 words.

Of a ship, the lower part of the hull, usually below the waterline. Hence the hull itself or the whole

Paulin, Tom (b.1949)

Edited by Sean McMahon and Jo O'Donoghue.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

January 2006; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 221 words.

He was born in Leeds but grew up in Belfast. Educated at Hull and Lincoln College, Oxford, he is a

tosher

Edited by Russ Willey.

in Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 38 words.

A man who in the 19th century stole copper from the hulls of ships moored in the Thames. Also

Bilge water

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 34 words.

The filthy water that collects in a ship’s bilge, this being the part of the hull where the sides curve

catamaran

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 25 words.

[E17th]

This word describes a yacht or other boat with twin hulls in parallel; it is from Tamil kattumaram,

hive

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 30 words.

[Old English]

This Germanic word is probably related to Old Norse húfr ‘hull of a ship’ and Latin cupa ‘tub,