Oxford Index Search Results

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community x Ancient Roman History x clear all

community

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Arts and Humanities.

Many sociological and anthropological definitions exist, but most tend to privilege some combination of small-scale, relative boundedness, strong affective ties, traditionalism, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

Identity and the Military Community in Roman Britain

Ian Haynes.

P ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 8086 words.

This chapter explores various approaches to gender, status, religion, and ethnicity within military communities in Roman Britain. It argues that the rich array of data found in and around...

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Identity and the Military Community in Roman Britain

Ian Haynes.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Britain

September 2016; p ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 8081 words.

This chapter explores various approaches to gender, status, religion, and ethnicity within military communities in Roman Britain. It argues that the rich array of data found in and around...

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peregrini

A. N. Sherwin-White and Andrew Lintott.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 166 words.

Peregrini, foreigners—the term used by Romans for the free citizens of any other community than the Roman people. This was the status of the peoples of non-Roman Italy, except the Latins (see...

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Sabini

Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 544 words.

People of ancient Italy. The Sabines occupied an area to the north-east of Rome along the eastern side of the *Tiber valley and extending to the *Apennine uplands. Their main centres in the...

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Caerites

Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 294 words.

Caeretans were the inhabitants of the Etruscan city of *Caere. But the name was also applied to a category of Roman citizens, and occurs in the phrase tabulae Caeritum (‘tables of the Caeretans’)....

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tribus

Arnaldo Momigliano and Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 807 words.

Division of the Roman people. In early times the Roman people were supposedly divided into three tribes (the word tribus may be connected with Latin tres = three) called Ramnes, Tities, and...

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Rome, history, from the origins to 31 BCE

Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 6613 words.

Surviving literary accounts of the beginnings of Rome are based entirely on legend. The stories provide evidence of what the Romans at various times thought about their own origins and how they liked...

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Tarquinius Priscus, Lucius, king of Rome

Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History. 559 words.

Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, the fifth king of Rome (traditionally 616–579 bce), was believed to be the son of *Demaratus(1) of *Corinth, who fled to *Tarquinii to escape the *tyranny of *Cypselus....

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colonization, Roman

A. N. Sherwin-White, Barbara Levick and Edward Henry Bispham.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History; Greek and Roman Archaeology. 1783 words.

The earliest colonies of Roman citizens were small groups of 300 families at *Ostia, *Antium (338 bce), and *Tarracina (329 bce). Others were added as the Roman territory expanded, through reluctance...

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Romano-British Archaeology in the Early Twenty-First Century

Pete Wilson.

P ublished online August 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 7999 words.

This chapter traces the development of Romano-British archaeology and examines the professional and academic frameworks within which practitioners operate in the early twenty-first century....

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Romano-British Archaeology in the Early Twenty-First Century

Pete Wilson.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Britain

September 2016; p ublished online August 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 8015 words.

This chapter traces the development of Romano-British archaeology and examines the professional and academic frameworks within which practitioners operate in the early twenty-first century....

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Arable Farming, Horticulture, and Food

Marijke Van der Veen.

P ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 12209 words.

The archaeobotanical evidence for food and farming in Roman Britain reveals continuity in the two principal cereals grown, but a marked increase in the scale of arable production in...

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Arable Farming, Horticulture, and Food

Marijke Van der Veen.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Britain

September 2016; p ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 12208 words.

The archaeobotanical evidence for food and farming in Roman Britain reveals continuity in the two principal cereals grown, but a marked increase in the scale of arable production in...

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Introduction

Michael Peachin.

in The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World

February 2011; p ublished online September 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 18578 words.

This article introduces the social relations of Romans in the ancient Roman Empire. It notes that the most basic driving force in these social relations involved a strong desire to rank...

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imperium

Peter Sidney Derow.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History; Greek and Roman Law. 1196 words.

Imperium was the supreme power, involving command in war and the interpretation and execution of law (including the infliction of the death penalty), which belonged at Rome to the kings (see rex)...

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Inscriptions and Identity

Valerie M. Hope.

P ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 9190 words.

The inscriptions of Roman Britain are few in number; in terms of its epigraphy Britain could be seen as the poor relation of the Roman Empire. Nevertheless the surviving inscriptions are a...

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Names of Gods

Amy Zoll.

P ublished online October 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 9181 words.

The myriad theonyms preserved in inscriptions reflect the diversity of Roman Britain’s inhabitants, but only a limited range of rites—mainly vows and curses—contributed to the epigraphic...

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Memories of the Past in Roman Britain

Zena Kamash.

P ublished online December 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 7722 words.

After setting out the history of memory studies and the role of archaeology in these studies, this chapter examines three realms of memory in Roman Britain: the burial of memories; the...

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Rural Transformation in the Urbanized Landscape

Martin Pitts.

P ublished online August 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 8934 words.

The impact of cities in the urbanized landscape of Roman Britain has long been debated. Were towns and colonies catalysts for rural economic growth or merely islands of colonial culture...

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Memories of the Past in Roman Britain

Zena Kamash.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Britain

September 2016; p ublished online December 2014 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Ancient Roman History. 7723 words.

After setting out the history of memory studies and the role of archaeology in these studies, this chapter examines three realms of memory in Roman Britain: the burial of memories; the...

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