Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-20 of 29 items for:

community x Greek and Roman Law x clear all

community

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Arts and Humanities.

Many sociological and anthropological definitions exist, but most tend to privilege some combination of small-scale, relative boundedness, strong affective ties, traditionalism, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

citizenship, Roman

Michael Crawford.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 939 words.

In both the Greek and the Roman world in the Archaic period, it seems that communities were open to the arrival of people from elsewhere, at all social levels, whether one thinks of Hesiod's father,...

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synoecism

Victor Ehrenberg and P. J. Rhodes.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 254 words.

Synoecism (synoikismos), in the Greek world, the combination of several smaller communities to form a single larger community. Sometimes the union was purely political and did not affect the pattern...

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endogamy

Mark Golden.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 441 words.

Marrying within (1) the citizen body or (2) the kin group.1. Colonists and others on the margins of the Greek world often intermarried with native populations, and the Archaic élite regularly made...

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autonomy

Simon Hornblower.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 396 words.

In internal affairs it means the state of affairs where a community is responsible for its own laws; in this sense it is opposed to *tyranny (Hdt. 1. 96. 1) and means self-determination, whereas...

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lex (2), kinds and specific examples of Roman law

Michael Crawford.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 3755 words.

It is clear from *Priscian, Institutes 2. 49–50 = 2. 75 Keil, that the concept of leges frumentariae, agrariae, nummariae, and so on (see below) was familiar to the Romans. We discuss a number of...

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punishment, Greek and Roman practice

Andrew Lintott.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 889 words.

According to *Cicero (Ad Brut. 23. 3), it was a dictum of *Solon's that a community was held together by rewards and penalties, and the ascription seems plausible, in so far as Archaic Greek...

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ius Italicum

Barry Nicholas.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 176 words.

Ius Italicum was a privilege granted to certain communities in the Roman provinces whereby their land was treated in law as if it were in Italy. It was thus exempted from the rule that land in the...

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dediticii

Michael Crawford.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 159 words.

Originally, persons who have made a deditio in fidem, an unconditional surrender, to Rome; the normal consequence in the case of a whole community was that Rome regulated their status,...

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exile, Greek

Simon Hornblower.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 535 words.

Exile (φυγή, literally ‘flight’) is permanent (aeiphygia) or long-term removal from one's native place, usually as a punishment imposed by government or other superior power. In Greece it was from...

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populus

Tim Cornell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 274 words.

Populus, a collective term for the Roman citizen body. The Roman People (populus Romanus) comprised the entire community of adult male citizens, but excluded women and children, as well as slaves and...

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curator rei publicae

Graham Burton.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 249 words.

Curator rei publicae (or civitatis, etc. ), in Greek λογιστής, was an official of the central government; the first certain example occurs under *Domitian (ILS 1017). Curatores normally were...

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adoption, Greek

Mark Golden.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 805 words.

Greeks counted on their heirs for support in old *age, and for continuation of their oikoi (families) and tendance of their tombs after death. But high mortality ensured that many had no surviving...

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decision-making, Greek

P. J. Rhodes.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 370 words.

A Greek state was the community of its citizens, and at any rate the most important decisions were made by an assembly of the citizens. *democracies and *oligarchies differed not over that...

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law and procedure, Athenian

D. M. MacDowell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 2959 words.

Greeks used the same word (νόμος) for both custom and law, and the beginning of law is hard to define. One reasonable view is that an unwritten rule should be regarded as a law if the community or...

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pagus

Nicholas Purcell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 248 words.

Pagus, term of Roman administrative law for subdivisions of territories, referring to a space rather than a point, and thus convenient for subdividing areas where there was no focal settlement, and...

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freedmen, freedwomen

M. I. Finley and Susan M. Treggiari.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 530 words.

Emancipated slaves were more prominent in Roman society (little is known of other Italian societies before their enfranchisement) than in Greek city-states or Hellenistic kingdoms (see slavery). In...

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freedom in the ancient world

K. Raaflaub.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 1547 words.

On the individual and social levels, the distinction between free and unfree is as old as slavery, and individual or collective freedom from dues, taxes, and other obligations as old as communities...

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proxenos/proxeny

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and Simon Hornblower.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 263 words.

Since Greek states did not send permanent diplomatic representatives abroad, local citizens served as proxenoi to look after the interests of other states in their community. By the beginning of the...

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agrarian laws and policy

Andrew Lintott.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 692 words.

Allocation of land by the community is attested in the Greek world at the times of new city foundations (colonies; see colonization, greek), and when land was annexed (*cleruchies). There is also...

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The Athenian Reconciliation Agreement of 403 bce and its Legacy for Greek City-States in the Classical and Hellenistic Ages

C. Joyce.

in The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Law

P ublished online July 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Studies; Greek and Roman Law. 18447 words.

This chapter surveys amnesty agreements throughout the Greek world in the Classical and Hellenistic ages and argues that in many the principle of political forgiveness was both important...

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