Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-20 of 282 items for:

community x Buddhism x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

community

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Arts and Humanities.

Many sociological and anthropological definitions exist, but most tend to privilege some combination of small-scale, relative boundedness, strong affective ties, traditionalism, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

Communities

Ruth Gamble.

in Reincarnation in Tibetan Buddhism

September 2018; p ublished online August 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: East Asian Religions; Buddhism. 12504 words.

Chapter 3 describes the various communities within which the traditions and institutions of reincarnation lineages developed. It begins by examining a subtle but influential shift in the...

Go to »  abstract

 Community Law

Charles Ramble.

in The Navel of the Demoness

February 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 21913 words.

The distinction that has been made in earlier chapters between the community as an assemblage of individuals and as a collectivity is developed further through an examination of local legal...

Go to »  abstract

Imagining Community through Commentary

Anne E. Monius.

in Imagining a Place for Buddhism

January 2002; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 10865 words.

The commentary on the Vīracōliyam discussed here (which really constitutes a text in its own right) brings together fragments of a considerable corpus of Buddhist narrative and devotional...

Go to »  abstract

Morals, Conduct, and Community

Alicia Turner.

in Saving Buddhism

October 2014; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 14393 words.

This chapter examines the campaigns of Buddhist lay associations to reform morals and manners among Buddhists, shaping a growing sense of moral community. Drawing on previously unexamined...

Go to University of Hawaii Press »  abstract

The Maṇimēkalai's Buddhist Community Envisioned

Anne E. Monius.

in Imagining a Place for Buddhism

January 2002; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 17543 words.

The community of Buddhists imagined within the narrative world of the Maṇimēkalai itself is considered – a community whose locus is not the geographical region of Tamil‐speaking southern...

Go to »  abstract

Individualist and Community-Oriented Mind Cure

Wakoh Shannon Hickey.

in Mind Cure

March 2019; p ublished online March 2019 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism; Religious Studies. 9172 words.

This chapter surveys the rise of the Mind Cure movements that spread outward from the teachings of Quimby, including Christian Science and New Thought. Like most histories of these...

Go to »  abstract

The Maṇimēkalai's Community of Readers and Listeners

Anne E. Monius.

in Imagining a Place for Buddhism

January 2002; p ublished online November 2003 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 18101 words.

The nature of the Maṇimēkalai's textual or reading community is considered through an examination of the narrative as a literary work produced in the context of a diverse and multilingual...

Go to »  abstract

Wuyin, the Guiding Light of the Community

Chün-Fang Yü.

in Passing the Light

May 2013; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 9718 words.

This chapter focuses on the establishment of the Incense Light community under Wuyin. Incense Light Temple was originally a local temple with no Buddhist history. In colonial Taiwan, nuns...

Go to University of Hawaii Press »  abstract

The Beginning of the Incense Light Community

Chün-Fang Yü.

in Passing the Light

May 2013; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 7319 words.

This chapter discusses the history of the Incense Light community and its headquarters, the Incense Light Temple (Xiangguang Si). Located in the village of Neipu in Zhuji County, Chiayi...

Go to University of Hawaii Press »  abstract

Refuge in the Sangha: The Shape of Buddhist Communities

in Heartwood

December 2004; p ublished online March 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 14278 words.

This chapter investigates how practitioners at Wat Phila and the Cambridge Insight Meditation Center (CIMC) structure themselves inside each organization into communities or groups and...

Go to University of Chicago Press »  abstract

Diasporic Buddhisms and Convert Communities

John Nelson.

in The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Buddhism

January 2017; p ublished online December 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Buddhism. 8845 words.

This chapter explores issues of diasporic Buddhist movement and cultural adaptation, as well as how individuals affiliate with Buddhist denominations in diverse settings worldwide. One of...

Go to »  abstract

Buddhist Communities Abroad

Thomas A. Tweed.

in The Oxford Handbook of Global Religions

October 2006; p ublished online September 2009 .

Article. Subjects: Religion; Interfaith Relations; Buddhism. 4671 words.

Buddhism arose during the fifth century BCE in what is today Nepal and northeastern India to become one of the world's first transregional religions. In crossing from one region to another,...

Go to »  abstract

Zanabazar (1635–1723): Vajrayāna Art and the State in Medieval Mongolia

Uranchimeg Tsultemin.

in Buddhism in Mongolian History, Culture, and Society

February 2015; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 7520 words.

The chapter focuses on the Buddhist artistic expression of the First Jebtsundamba Khutugtu (1635–1723), one of the most celebrated persons in the history of Mongolian Buddhism, who is...

Go to »  abstract

The Social and Cultural Practices of Buddhism: The Local Context of Inner Mongolia in the First Half of the Twentieth Century

Hürelbaatar Ujeed.

in Buddhism in Mongolian History, Culture, and Society

February 2015; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 6521 words.

As the Gelugpa tradition of Tibetan Buddhism spread throughout Inner Asia, it flourished in the territories of what is now Inner Mongolia for 400 years. However, Buddhism in Inner Mongolia...

Go to »  abstract

āryasaṃgha (P.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 192 words.

“Noble community” or “community of noble ones”; the community of followers of the Buddha who are noble persons (āryapudgala

ārya-saṃgha

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 50 words.

(Skt., noble community).

The community of the āryas or those ‘noble persons’ (ārya-pudgala) who have attained the supermundane

saṃghabheda (P.)

Edited by Robert E. Buswell and David S. Lopez.

in The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

P ublished online July 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 420 words.

In Sanskrit, “splitting the community”; the act of causing a schism in the community of Buddhist monks and nuns (

ārāma

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Pāli).

Site or residence occupied by a monastic community during the rainy season.

See overview in Oxford Index

Gendun

Overview page. Subjects: Buddhism.

(Tib., dge-'dun).

The Tibetan term for the monastic community or Saṃgha.

See overview in Oxford Index

ārāma

Damien Keown.

in A Dictionary of Buddhism

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Buddhism. 14 words.

(Pāli).

Site or residence occupied by a monastic community during the rainy season.