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community x Criminal and Forensic Psychology x clear all

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community

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Arts and Humanities.

Many sociological and anthropological definitions exist, but most tend to privilege some combination of small-scale, relative boundedness, strong affective ties, traditionalism, and...

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Sexually Violent Predators, Criminal and Civil Confinement, and Community Re-Entry

Bruce A. Arrigo, Heather Y. Bersot and Brian G. Sellers.

in The Ethics of Total Confinement

June 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 19052 words.

This chapter provides background on sexually violent predators (SVPs), reviews the social and behavioural science literature documenting the recidivism effects of confinement, and describes...

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The Admissibility of Scientific Evidence

Brigitte Vallabhajosula.

in Murder in the Courtroom

January 2015; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology; Neuropsychology. 5969 words.

Although the reality of brain impairment and its effect on judgment is well accepted in the scientific community, how brain dysfunction may have contributed to a particular criminal offense...

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Extending Rehabilitative Principles to Violent Sexual Offenders

Judith V. Becker and Jill D. Stinson.

in Using Social Science to Reduce Violent Offending

September 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 8979 words.

Sex offenders in correctional or other forensic residential settings present a number of challenges for those responsible for treating and assessing their risk to the community. This...

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Putting Science to Work

Susan Turner and Joan Petersilia.

in Using Social Science to Reduce Violent Offending

September 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 8298 words.

This chapter focuses on prisoner reentry and/or community supervision on parole. Besides discussing the applicability of Risk-Need-Responsivity principles to the parole context, it also...

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Assessment of Mock Jurors’ Attributions and Decisions in Child Abuse Cases

Jenny Reichert and Monica K. Miller.

in Psychology, Law, and the Wellbeing of Children

January 2014; p ublished online April 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 9724 words.

Rising rates of childhood obesity and concern over the wellbeing of obese children has led to an increase in prosecutions in which parents of obese children are charged with abuse. Criminal...

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Introduction

Barbara Jo Fidler, Nicholas Bala and Michael A. Saini.

in Children Who Resist PostSeparation Parental Contact

August 2012; p ublished online September 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 4705 words.

After separation or divorce, children may resist or reject contact with a parent for many reasons. The term “alienation” is used to refer to a situation “where the child's rejection or...

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Mental Health Professionals and Suicide

Susan Stefan.

in Rational Suicide, Irrational Laws

March 2016; p ublished online April 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 22468 words.

This chapter analyzes legal and social policy barriers to improving treatment for people who are suicidal. It supports Edwin Shneidman’s assertion that suicidality is not necessarily a...

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Extending Violence Reduction Principles to Justice-Involved Persons With Mental Illness

John Monahan and Henry J. Steadman.

in Using Social Science to Reduce Violent Offending

September 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 6921 words.

This chapter examines whether—and, if so, how—principles of violence risk reduction can be extended to justice-involved persons who have a serious mental illness. It focuses on...

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Using Social Science to Reduce Violent Offending

Edited by Joel A. Dvoskin, Jennifer L. Skeem, Raymond W. Novaco and Kevin S. Douglas.

September 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Book. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 344 pages.

This book articulates how social science can be applied to inform improvements in correctional policy and practice across the criminal justice system. The chapters reflect an iterative...

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Diminishing Support for the Death Penalty

Amelia Courtney Hritz, Caisa Elizabeth Royer and Valerie P. Hans.

in Criminal Juries in the 21st Century

October 2018; p ublished online September 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 8569 words.

This chapter presents and analyzes the current state of law and research on the capital jury. First, it presents the legal framework for capital jury selection and research on the...

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The Role of Emotion and Motivation in Jury Decision-Making

Colin Holloway and Richard L. Wiener.

in Criminal Juries in the 21st Century

October 2018; p ublished online September 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 10451 words.

Abstract: American law requires jurors to impartially evaluate information presented during trial to render a just verdict based primarily—if not solely—on relevant facts of the case. These...

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Expert Psychology Testimony on Eyewitness Identification: Consensus Among Experts?

Harmon M. Hosch, Kevin W. Jolly, Larissa A. Schmersal and Brooke A. Smith.

in Expert Testimony on the Psychology of Eyewitness Identification

October 2009; p ublished online September 2009 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 11937 words.

A criterion a judge uses to decide whether to admit expert psychology testimony in a court of law will be whether there is a consensus among experts as to the facts of the testimony the...

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Psycholegal Aspects of Juvenile Delinquency

Cheryl D. Wills.

in Psychology, Law, and the Wellbeing of Children

January 2014; p ublished online April 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 7171 words.

The U.S. juvenile justice system was established to maintain community safety and to positively affect the wellbeing of children by providing rehabilitation for juvenile offenders. Through...

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Female Juvenile Offenders’ Perceptions of Gender-Specific Programs

Monica K. Miller, Lacey Miller and Angela D. Broadus.

in Psychology, Law, and the Wellbeing of Children

January 2014; p ublished online April 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 7368 words.

Gender-specific programming for juvenile offenders adheres to the principles of therapeutic jurisprudence and restorative justice by striving to understand why young females become...

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The Law and Child Wellbeing

Twila Wingrove and Jennifer L. Jarrett.

in Psychology, Law, and the Wellbeing of Children

January 2014; p ublished online April 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 5872 words.

The purpose of this book was to identify and review current legal policies and practices that impact children’s and adolescents’ wellbeing. In this concluding chapter, the authors identify...

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The Right to Die, Involuntary Commitment, and the Constitution

Susan Stefan.

in Rational Suicide, Irrational Laws

March 2016; p ublished online April 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 34299 words.

This chapter analyzes whether a competent person should have the right to die and under what circumstances this right, if it exists, should apply to people with psychiatric disabilities....

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Using the Law to Enhance Wellbeing: Applying Therapeutic Jurisprudence in the Courtroom

Lorie L. Sicafuse and Brian H. Bornstein.

in Stress, Trauma, and Wellbeing in the Legal System

December 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 12300 words.

The notion that the law should be used as a therapeutic agent has become increasing popular among social scientists and legal professionals. This chapter provides an overview of the ways in...

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Evaluation

Gianni Pirelli.

in The Behavioral Science of Firearms

January 2019; p ublished online November 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 26926 words.

In this chapter, the authors address evaluations across settings and contexts, such as mental health screenings conducted in community, outpatient, and inpatient settings, with particular...

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Juvenile Transfer, Developmental Maturity, and Competency to Stand Trial

Bruce A. Arrigo, Heather Y. Bersot and Brian G. Sellers.

in The Ethics of Total Confinement

June 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 12486 words.

This chapter provides background on the juvenile transfer process, reviews the social and behavioural science literature on developmental maturity, and describes the concept of mental...

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Public Attitudes and Punitive Policies

Tom R. Tyler and Lindsay E. Rankin.

in Using Social Science to Reduce Violent Offending

September 2011; p ublished online September 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal and Forensic Psychology. 10041 words.

This chapter discusses how public attitudes help shape penal policy. It argues that law enforcement and the public have ambivalently embraced an instrumental approach, that is, the threat...

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