Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-11 of 11 items for:

community x Plant-Microbe Interactions x clear all

community

Overview page. Subjects: Social Sciences — Arts and Humanities.

Many sociological and anthropological definitions exist, but most tend to privilege some combination of small-scale, relative boundedness, strong affective ties, traditionalism, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

More closely related plants have more distinct mycorrhizal communities

Kurt O. Reinhart and Brian L. Anacker.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online September 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions. 5583 words.

Neighbouring plants are known to vary from having similar to dissimilar arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. One possibility is that closely related plants have more similar AMF...

Soil microbial community variation correlates most strongly with plant species identity, followed by soil chemistry, spatial location and plant genus

Jean H. Burns, Brian L. Anacker, Sharon Y. Strauss and David J. Burke.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online April 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 5812 words.

Soil ecologists have debated the relative importance of dispersal limitation and ecological factors in determining the structure of soil microbial communities. Recent evidence suggests that...

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Composition of fungal soil communities varies with plant abundance and geographic origin

Vanessa Reininger, Laura B. Martinez-Garcia, Laura Sanderson and Pedro M. Antunes.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online September 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Sciences and Forestry; Plant Pathology and Diseases; Ecology and Conservation. 8400 words.

Interactions of belowground fungal communities with exotic and native plant species may be important drivers of plant community structure in invaded grasslands. However, field surveys...

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Extractable nitrogen and microbial community structure respond to grassland restoration regardless of historical context and soil composition

Sara Jo M. Dickens, Edith B. Allen, Louis S. Santiago and David Crowley.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online February 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Pathology and Diseases; Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 7399 words.

Grasslands have a long history of invasion by exotic annuals, which may alter microbial communities and nutrient cycling through changes in litter quality and biomass turnover rates. We...

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Inter-plant communication through mycorrhizal networks mediates complex adaptive behaviour in plant communities

Monika A. Gorzelak, Amanda K. Asay, Brian J. Pickles and Suzanne W. Simard.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online May 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry; Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions. 9526 words.

Adaptive behaviour of plants, including rapid changes in physiology, gene regulation and defence response, can be altered when linked to neighbouring plants by a mycorrhizal network (MN)....

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A mutualistic endophyte alters the niche dimensions of its host plant

Melanie R. Kazenel, Catherine L. Debban, Luciana Ranelli, Will Q. Hendricks, Y. Anny Chung, Thomas H. Pendergast, Nikki D. Charlton, Carolyn A. Young and Jennifer A. Rudgers.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online March 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions. 7531 words.

Mutualisms can play important roles in influencing species coexistence and determining community composition. However, few studies have tested whether such interactions can affect species...

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Linkages of plant–soil feedbacks and underlying invasion mechanisms

Inderjit and James F. Cahill.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online April 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Pathology and Diseases; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 4677 words.

Soil microbial communities and processes have repeatedly been shown to impact plant community assembly and population growth. Soil-driven effects may be particularly pronounced with the...

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Competition and soil resource environment alter plant–soil feedbacks for native and exotic grasses

Loralee Larios and Katharine N. Suding.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online November 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Pathology and Diseases; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 5109 words.

Feedbacks between plants and soil biota are increasingly identified as key determinants of species abundance patterns within plant communities. However, our understanding of how plant–soil...

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Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

Nicole E. Nolan, Andrew Kulmatiski, Karen H. Beard and Jeanette M. Norton.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online January 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry; Plant Pathology and Diseases; Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions. 6808 words.

There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the...

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Belowground legacies of Pinus contorta invasion and removal result in multiple mechanisms of invasional meltdown

Ian A. Dickie, Mark G. St John, Gregor W. Yeates, Chris W. Morse, Karen I. Bonner, Kate Orwin and Duane A. Peltzer.

in AoB PLANTS

January 2014; p ublished online October 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Biochemistry; Plant Pathology and Diseases; Biodiversity and Conservation Biology; Ecology and Conservation; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 8398 words.

Plant invasions can change soil biota and nutrients in ways that drive subsequent plant communities, particularly when co-invading with belowground mutualists such as ectomycorrhizal fungi....

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Mutualism-disrupting allelopathic invader drives carbon stress and vital rate decline in a forest perennial herb

Nathan L. Brouwer, Alison N. Hale and Susan Kalisz.

in AoB PLANTS

P ublished online March 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Plant Pathology and Diseases; Ecology and Conservation; Plant Physiology; Plant-Microbe Interactions; Biodiversity and Conservation Biology; Plant Sciences and Forestry. 8849 words.

Invasive plants can negatively affect belowground processes and alter soil microbial communities. For native plants that depend on soil resources from root fungal symbionts (RFS), invasion...

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