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empathy x Public Policy x clear all

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Empathy and Alteration: The Ethical Relevance of a Phenomenological Species Concept

Darian Meacham.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

October 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 11004 words.

The debate over the ethics of radically, technologically altering the capacities and traditional form of the human body is rife with appeals to and dismissals of the importance of the...

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Moving on?

Marjorie Mayo.

in Changing Communities

July 2017; p ublished online January 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Public Policy. 4749 words.

Having summarised the underlying structural factors to be addressed, in the context of neo-liberal globalisation, this concluding chapter focuses upon the issues to be addressed within and null...

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The Wrong of Rights: The Moral Authority of the Family

Stephen A. Erickson.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

October 2010; p ublished online September 2010 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 7569 words.

I argue that the notion of human rights is a flawed notion of relatively recent historical origin, growing primarily out of Enlightenment concerns to separate human beings from their...

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A Phenomenology of the ‘Placebo Effect’: Taking Meaning from the Mind to the Body

Oron Frenkel.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

February 2008; p ublished online February 2008 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 9665 words.

Most mainstream attempts to understand the “placebo effect” invoke expectancy theory, arguing that expecting certain outcomes from a treatment or intervention can manifest those outcomes....

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“Nobody Understands”: On a Cardinal Phenomenon of Palliative Care

Tomasz R. Okon.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 0 words.

In the clinical practice of palliative medicine, recommended communication models fail to approximate the truth of suffering associated with an impending death. I provide evidence from...

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On Duties to Provide Basic Health and Dental Care to Children

Loretta M. Kopelman.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

January 2001; p ublished online January 2001 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 0 words.

Children around the world suffer from poor health outcomes due to a lack of basic health and dental care, even in affluent countries. Yet duties exist to provide children these services...

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Trust in Medicine

Chalmers C. Clark.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 0 words.

Trust relations in medicine are argued to be a requisite response to the special vulnerability of persons as patients. Even so, the problem of motivating trust remains a vital concern. On...

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AIDS and Africa

Loretta M. Kopelman and Anton A. van Niekerk.

in The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine

January 2002; p ublished online January 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Philosophy; Medical Ethics; Bioethics; Public Policy. 0 words.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and in this issue of the Journal, seven authors discuss the moral, social and medical implications of having 70% of those...

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