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eponym

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics — Medicine and Health.

(ep-ŏ-nim)

a disease, structure, or species named after a particular person, usually the person who first discovered or described it.

—eponymous (i-pon-i-mŭs) adj.

See overview in Oxford Index

eponym

Robert C. King, William D. Stansfield and Pamela K. Mulligan.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 158 words.

a word, phrase, or abbreviation derived from the name of a person or place. Eponyms often honor the discoverers of

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eponym

Robert C. King, Pamela K. Mulligan and William D. Stansfield.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 158 words.

a word, phrase, or abbreviation derived from the name of a person or place. Eponyms often honor the discoverers of

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eponym

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 152 words.

1 An eponym is a person after whom something is named, such as a building, an institution, an organization, a

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eponym

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 306 words.

Eponym (= a person, place, or thing that gives its name to someone or something else) is sometimes misused to

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eponym

Edited by Robert Allen.

in Pocket Fowler's Modern English Usage

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 152 words.

1 An eponym is a person after whom something is named, such as a building, an institution, an organization, a

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Eponyms

Richard M. Glass.

in AMA Manual of Style

March 2007; p ublished online April 2009 .

Chapter. Subjects: Medicine and Health; Language Reference. 1488 words.

Eponyms are names or phrases derived from or including the name of a person or place. These terms are used in a descriptive or adjectival sense1 in medical and scientific writing to...

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eponym n.

Edited by Elizabeth Martin.

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2015; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 69 words.

a disease, structure, or species named after a particular person, usually the person who first discovered or described it. Eponyms are widespread in medicine, but they are being replaced as...

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Eponyms in OMFS

Edited by Cyrus Kerawala and Carrie Newlands.

in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

June 2014; p ublished online October 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Surgery; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 1342 words.

This chapter contains a list of useful eponyms and their derivations.

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eponym

Overview page. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics — Medicine and Health.

(ep-ŏ-nim)

a disease, structure, or species named after a particular person, usually the person who first discovered or described it.

—eponymous (i-pon-i-mŭs) adj.

See overview in Oxford Index

eponym

in Concise Medical Dictionary

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 69 words.

n. a disease, structure, or species named after a particular person, usually the person who first discovered or described it.

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Eponym

Edited by Tom McArthur.

in Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

January 1998; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 245 words.

1 A personal name from which a word has been derived: John B. Stetson, the 19c US hatter after

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eponym

Edited by Jeremy Butterfield.

in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage

January 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 198 words.

originally, a person after whom a discovery, invention, place, institution, etc., is named: for example, Alois Alzheimer (1864–1915), after whom Alzheimer’s disease is named, and Sir Thomas...

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eponym

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 112 words.

bedim, brim, crim, dim, glim, grim, Grimm, gym, him, hymn, Jim, Kim, limb, limn, nim, prim, quim, rim,

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eponym

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 112 words.

bedim, brim, crim, dim, glim, grim, Grimm, gym, him, hymn, Jim, Kim, limb, limn, nim, prim, quim, rim,

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eponym

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 29 words.

An individual name from which a common noun is derived: e.g. that of ‘the eponymous’ Lord Sandwich as the source

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eponym

P. H. Matthews.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics

January 2014; p ublished online May 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Linguistics. 29 words.

An individual name from which a common noun is derived: e.g. that of ‘the eponymous’ Lord Sandwich as the source for ...

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eponyms

Elizabeth Martin.

in The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 210 words.

A law, theory, theorem, hypothesis, principle, rule, formula, equation, or disease named after a person is usually preceded by the

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eponym

Stephen Lock, John M. Last and George Dunea.

in The Oxford Companion to Medicine

January 2001; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medicine and Health. 63 words.

The name of a person used as part of the name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical feature, etc. (e.g. Bright's

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Eponym

Edited by Tom McArthur, Jacqueline Lam-McArthur and Lise Fontaine.

in The Oxford Companion to the English Language

May 2018; p ublished online May 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 247 words.

1. A personal name from which a word has been derived: John B. Stetson, the 19c US hatter after whom the ...

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A New Dictionary of Eponyms

Morton S. Freeman.

January 1997; p ublished online January 2002 .

Book. Subjects: History of English. 402 pages. 102130 words.

This dictionary features the entertaining histories behind hundreds of eponyms, such as bowdlerize (from the censorious Thomas Bowdler), bikini from the atoll, and the Salisbury steak, a...

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