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founder

Overview page. Subjects: Warfare and Defence — Maritime History.

Of a ship, to sink at sea, generally understood to be by the flooding of its hull either through springing a leak or through striking a rock. Other causes of a ship sinking, such as...

See overview in Oxford Index

Freud, Sigmund (1856–1939), founder of psychoanalysis

Susan Austin.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 8069 words.

Freud, Sigmund (1856–1939), founder of psychoanalysis, was born on 6 May 1856 at Freiberg, Moravia, in the Austro-Hungarian empire (later Príbor, Czech republic), the first of the seven...

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Zangwill, Oliver Louis (1913–1987), a founder of neuropsychology

Richard L. Gregory.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Neurology; Psychology. 840 words.

Zangwill, Oliver Louis (1913–1987), a founder of neuropsychology, was born on 29 October 1913 in East Preston, Sussex, the second son and youngest of three children in the family of Israel...

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founder effect n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 44 words.

The tendency for an isolated offshoot of a population to develop genetic differences from the parent population owing to the

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founder effect n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 44 words.

The tendency for an isolated offshoot of a population to develop genetic differences from the parent population owing to the

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agnosia n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 722 words.

A term introduced in 1891 by the Austrian neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), nowadays denoting

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agnosia n.

Andrew M. Colman.

in A Dictionary of Psychology

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 720 words.

A term introduced in 1891 by the Austrian neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), nowadays denoting

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Adler, Alfred (1870–1937)

Brian Lake.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 1385 words.

(1870–1937).

Founder of the School of Individual Psychology. He was born in Vienna, and qualified in medicine in

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Bowlby, John (1907–90)

Joan Stevenson-Hinde.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 1200 words.

(1907–90).

Psychiatrist and founder of attachment theory.

The son of Sir Anthony and Lady Bowlby, Edward John

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Pieron, Henri (1881–1964)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 75 words.

(1881–1964).

Founder of French experimental psychology. He was trained in philosophy and physiology, and became a leader in

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Vygotsky, Leo (1896–1934)

A. R. Luria.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 863 words.

The most outstanding Soviet psychologist, and founder of the most influential school of Soviet psychology, Vygotsky was born in Orsha

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Watson, John Broadus (1878–1958)

Robert Epstein.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 553 words.

(1878–1958).

The founder of the American school of psychology known as behaviourism. The movement was launched in

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Wertheimer, Max (1880–1943)

O. L. Zangwill.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 123 words.

(1880–1943).

Born in Prague, Wertheimer is conventionally regarded as the founder of Gestalt psychology. Working under F. Schumann

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Zangwill, Oliver (1913–87)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 1932 words.

(1913–87).

A principal founder of neurospsychology and professor of experimental psychology in the University of Cambridge from 1952

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Herophilus (fl. 300 bc)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 64 words.

(fl. 300 bc).

Greek anatomist, and founder of the medical school of Alexandria. He was the

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Lobachevski, Nikolai Ivanovich (1793–1856)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 57 words.

(1793–1856).

Russian mathematician, founder of non-Euclidian geometry. This was extremely important in epistemology as it showed

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Müller, Johannes Peter (1801–58)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 212 words.

(1801–58).

German physiologist and anatomist, widely regarded as the founder of modern physiology. Born and educated in Koblenz,

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Comte, Auguste (1798–1857)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 140 words.

(1798–1857).

French philosopher and sociologist, and the founder of positivism. His main work is Philosophie positive (6

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Gall, Franz Joseph (1758–1828)

O. L. Zangwill.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 182 words.

(1758–1828).

German anatomist and founder of phrenology, who was born in Baden and settled in Vienna (1785

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Kierkegaard, Søren Aaby (1813–55)

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 106 words.

(1813–55).

Danish philosopher, founder of existentialism. He read theology but did not take orders. Suffering ill-defined guilt,

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Köhler, Wolfgang (1887–1967)

O. L. Zangwill.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 447 words.

(1887–1967).

Co-founder and leading member of the Gestalt school of psychology, Köhler was born in Reval on the

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