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Overview page. Subjects: Economics.

(USA).

1 (Bonds) A trading convention for quoting the prices of securities. US treasuries are normally quoted in 32nd fractions of a point (1/32%). To quote a bid or...

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Fox, William Price (1926–2015)

James D. Hart.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

January 1986; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (American). 92 words.

reared in South Carolina, the setting for his stories collected in Southern Fried (1962) and Southern Fried Plus Six...

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Naturalism and Realism

Gary Scharnhorst.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Literature

P ublished online July 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Literary Studies (American). 8902 words.

At the most elementary level, realism may be equated with verisimilitude or the approximation of truth. A mimetic artist, the literary realist claims to mirror or represent the world as it...

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Jack Kerouac

Matt Theado.

in American Literature

P ublished online February 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Literary Studies (American). 11603 words.

Jack Kerouac (b. 1922–d. 1969) was a novelist and poet whose bestselling novel On the Road is considered an American classic. Born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac to working-class...

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‘GRINDING THE TEXTURES OF HARMONY’: HEROIC DIFFICULTY IN GEOFFREY HILL'S CLAVICS

Stefan Hawlin.

in English: Journal of the English Association

August 2014; p ublished online August 2014 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Literary Studies (Postcolonial Literature); Literary Studies (American); Literary Studies (British and Irish). 7080 words.

Appreciation of Geoffrey Hill's The Daybooks has been slow. In relation to Clavics (2011), the fourth ‘Daybook’, the issue of Hill's ‘difficulty’ has again come to the fore in responses....

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