Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-20 of 185 items for:

Asterism x clear all
Did you mean:

Show only full text

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

aster

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

A starlike arrangement of microtubules radiating from a centrosome. Asters become conspicuous in animal cells at the ends of the spindle when cell division starts. They are believed to help...

See overview in Oxford Index

aster

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 16 words.

genus of plants with radiated flowers. XVIII. — modL. use of L. astēr — Gr. astḗr STAR.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine.

in A Dictionary of Biology

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 52 words.

A starlike arrangement of microtubules radiating from a centrosome. Asters become conspicuous in animal cells at the ends of

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

Edited by Robert Hine and Elizabeth Martin.

in A Dictionary of Biology

June 2016; p ublished online September 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 52 words.

A starlike arrangement of microtubules radiating from a *centrosome. Asters become conspicuous in animal cells at the ends

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

-aster

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 40 words.

repr. L. -āster (whence F. -âtre), suffix of sbs. and adjs. expressing incomplete resemblance, and hence gen. of

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

in World Encyclopedia

P ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: General Studies. 26 words.

Genus of mostly perennial, leafy stemmed plants native to the Americas and Eurasia. Asters are popular garden plants and most

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

asterism

Edited by Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

P ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics; Astronomical Instrumentation, Methods, and Techniques; Galaxies. 77 words.

A distinctive pattern of stars that forms part of one or more constellations. For example, the familiar shape of the Plough or Big Dipper is an asterism within the constellation Ursa Major,...

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

asterism

Overview page. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics.

A distinctive pattern of stars that forms part of one or more constellations. For example, the familiar shape of the Plough or Big Dipper is an asterism within the constellation Ursa Major,...

See overview in Oxford Index

aster

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

A starlike arrangement of microtubules radiating from a centrosome. Asters become conspicuous in animal cells at the ends of the spindle when cell division starts. They are believed to help...

See overview in Oxford Index

Asterion (Son of Aeschylus)

in Benezit Dictionary of Artists

P ublished online October 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Metalwork; Greek and Roman Art. 73 words.

4th century, male.

Active at the end of the 4th century BC (?).

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Asterion made a statue dedicated at Olympia by the...

Go to Oxford Art Online »  home page

Corbould, Aster R. C.

in Benezit Dictionary of Artists

P ublished online October 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Painting; 19th-Century Art. 253 words.

British, 19th century, male.

Active in London.

Painter. Portraits, landscapes, animals.

Aster Corbould exhibited between 1842 and 1877. His works include some...

Go to Oxford Art Online »  home page

Trumpets and Asterisms

Alastair Fowler.

in Time's Purpled Masquers

June 1996; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800). 6205 words.

In the information age, fame can seem less metaphysical and more self-fulfilling. When the noise is the message, the burden of Fame's trumpet ...

Go to Oxford Scholarship Online »  abstract

aster

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

(family Asteraceae)

A genus of mostly perennial herbs in which the leaves are simple and spirally arranged, the flower heads have imbricate bracts and flat, naked receptacles; ray...

See overview in Oxford Index

asterion

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

An anatomical landmark. It marks the junction of the occipital, parietal, and temporal bones.

See overview in Oxford Index

Asterism

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design.

In jewellery and mineralogy, the appearance of light in the shape of a six-rayed star seen in some crystals, as in star sapphire and star ruby.

See overview in Oxford Index

ASTER

Overview page. Subjects: Meteorology and Climatology.

The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer carried on the Terra satellite. A high-resolution instrument for monitoring desertification, floods, ice cover, etc., as...

See overview in Oxford Index

ASTER

Burt Vance.

in A Dictionary of Abbreviations

P ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. 8 words.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

asterism

Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

January 2012; p ublished online January 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics. 75 words.

A distinctive pattern of stars that forms part of one or more constellations. For example, the familiar shape of the

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

John Lackie.

in A Dictionary of Biomedicine

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Clinical Medicine. 19 words.

The microtubules that radiate from the microtubule organizing centres at the spindle poles at the beginning of mitosis.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

Robert C. King, William D. Stansfield and Pamela K. Mulligan.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 4 words.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

aster

Robert C. King, Pamela K. Mulligan and William D. Stansfield.

in A Dictionary of Genetics

January 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Genetics and Genomics. 4 words.

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page