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chaos

Overview page. Subjects: Philosophy — Religion.

‘First of all Chaos came into being’, says Hesiod; it did not exist from everlasting. What it was like he does not say; the name means ‘gaping void’.

See overview in Oxford Index

Chaos

David Adams Leeming and Margaret Adams Leeming.

in A Dictionary of Creation Myths

January 1994; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 19 words.

Chaos is the Greek word for the dark void of pre‐creation (see also Creation from Chaos; Greek

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chaos

Edited by Ian Ridpath.

in A Dictionary of Astronomy

P ublished online February 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Astronomy and Astrophysics; Astronomical Instrumentation, Methods, and Techniques; Galaxies. 35 words.

A distinctive area of broken terrain on a planetary surface; pl. chaoses. The name is not a geological term but is used in the nomenclature of individual features, for example Iani Chaos on...

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chaos

Edited by Andrew Butterfield and Gerard Ekembe Ngondi.

in A Dictionary of Computer Science

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Computing. 30 words.

The phenomena of apparently random behaviour generated by simple deterministic systems. An essential hallmark of chaos in nonlinear systems is

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chaos

John Daintith and Edmund Wright.

in A Dictionary of Computing

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Computing. 30 words.

The phenomena of apparently random behavior generated by simple deterministic systems. An essential hallmark of chaos in nonlinear systems is

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Chaos

Edited by Stephen H. Schneider, Terry L. Root and Michael D. Mastrandrea.

in Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather

January 2011; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Meteorology and Climatology. 3640 words.

Here is an experiment in chaos: Blow up a balloon, point it toward a wall, and release it a meter

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Chaos

Edited by John Roberts.

in Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 29 words.

‘First of all Chaos came into being’, says Hesiod; it did not exist from everlasting. What it was like

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<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online September 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 220 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online September 2017 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 220 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online September 2018 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 249 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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Chaos

Patricia Monaghan.

in The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religion. 783 words.

Chaos appears in many mythologies, including the Greek from whom the word is derived, as an undifferentiated primordial state or

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Chaos

Herbert Jennings Rose.

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2005; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 86 words.

‘The very first of all Chaos came into being’, says Hesiod (Theogonia 116); it is noteworthy that he

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Chaos

in The Oxford Classical Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online December 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Classical Studies. 86 words.

‘The very first of all Chaos came into being’, says *Hesiod (Theog. 116); it is noteworthy that he

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chaos

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 163 words.

1. Historically, the contrast is between chaos, or the unordered, unformed, undifferentiated beginnings of things, and the *cosmos,

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chaos

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 163 words.

1. Historically, the contrast is between chaos, or the unordered, unformed, undifferentiated beginnings of things, and the *cosmos,

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chaos

Overview page. Subjects: Philosophy — Religion.

‘First of all Chaos came into being’, says Hesiod; it did not exist from everlasting. What it was like he does not say; the name means ‘gaping void’.

See overview in Oxford Index

<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 239 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online January 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 239 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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<p>Chaos</p>

Edited by Susan Ratcliffe.

in Oxford Essential Quotations

P ublished online January 2012 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 239 words.

Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit.

Henry Brooks Adams 1838–1918 American historian

The Education of Henry

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Chaos

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 62 words.

Chaos is the primal void or state of uniform non-differentiation that precedes the creation of the world in most creation

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chaos

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 119 words.

[LME]

A chaos from Greek khaos was originally ‘a gaping void, chasm’. The word later came to refer to the

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